• The Growing Partisan Divide Over Feminism by Peter Beinart – The Republican and Conservative Women Who Want to Remain in Denial About American Sexism

I became a Republican at a young age and left the Republican Party a few years ago. I am a conservative, I am pro-life, but I don’t belong to any political party. I’m not a liberal or a Democrat myself, nor do I go by the “feminist” label for reasons explained on other posts.

However, far more than other conservatives, I see the sexism in our culture. Sexism is not a thing of the past, as some of them like to believe or assert.

American women may have life easier or better than their counterparts in Islamic nations that practice Sharia Law, but American women face sexism never- the- less (sometimes American sexism can be just as bad, though, as I wrote about in this post, with examples).

I present below an article from The Atlantic which suggests that one reason so many conservatives are reluctant to admit that sexism is still prevalent in American culture is that they associate any and all discussion of sexism with far left wing feminism, and they despise far left wing feminism (most of them hear the word “feminism” and automatically and incorrectly associate all of it with extreme liberalism).

I also notice how so many Republican and conservative women are doing the very thing God predicted back in the book of Genesis (Genesis 3:16) that many women would do, as a result of the Fall (this was not God’s intent but a product of sin entering the world):

That they, women, would turn from God and instead turn to human men to receive protection, identity, and security. God warned that by doing this, that men would exploit this tendency of women and rule over women, and that is exactly what happened and what continues to happen today.

(I think it is less noticeable in contemporary American society than in certain other nations, such as the ones under Sharia Law. It was more noticeable in American culture decades ago than it is now.

See also:  Five Things Women Could Not Do in The 1960s

And: 11 Ordinary Things Women Weren’t Allowed To Do In The ’50s And ’60s)

American right wing women are selling out their own biological sex in the name of receiving security and stability from the men in their lives. They’re unwittingly helping to hold up the sexism that they think does not exist… but which does exist.

The article from The Atlantic, which is what prompted me to make this blog post:

The Growing Partisan Divide Over Feminism

Snippets:

Democratic men are 31 points more likely to say that the “country has not gone far enough on women’s rights” than Republican women.

by Peter Beinart

Amidst the exhilaration of Roy Moore’s defeat, and the broader cultural revolution sparked by women’s willingness to expose the sexual misdeeds of powerful men, it’s worth remembering this:
Ninety percent of Republican women in Alabama, according to exit polls, cast their ballots for a man credibly accused of pedophilia.

That’s a mere two points less than Republican men. By contrast, Democratic men voted for Moore’s opponent, Doug Jones, at the same rate as Democratic women: 98 percent….

…All of which [the study he had commissioned] points to a truth insufficiently appreciated in this moment of sexual and political upheaval: It’s not gender that increasingly divides the two parties. It is feminism.

… A key factor, [of effects of feminism on partisanship over time]  the authors  [Leonie Huddy and Johanna Willmann of Stony Brook University] speculated, was Hillary Clinton.

A liberal woman’s emergence as a serious presidential contender in 2008, and then as her party’s nominee eight years later, drove feminists of both genders toward the Democratic Party and anti-feminists of both genders toward the GOP.

…But what’s driving the polarization is less gender identity—do you identify as a man or a woman—than gender attitudes: Do you believe that women and men should be more equal. Democrats aren’t becoming the party of women. They’re becoming the party of feminists.

…But when it comes to the political reaction to sexual harassment, gender identity matters less and gender attitudes matter more.

“A sizable minority of American women,” note Huddy and Willmann, “do not believe in the existence of gender discrimination, think that women who charge men with gender discrimination are trouble makers, and are inclined to side with a man accused of discriminatory behavior.”

And Hillary Clinton’s presidential candidacy seems to have made these women more staunchly Republican.

Which helps explain why female Republicans express far less support for feminism than even male Democrats.

… In the 1990s, Republican women members were still noticeably more moderate than their male GOP colleagues. That created a significant degree of ideological affinity between women politicians across the aisle. Now it’s gone.

 ….Republicans of both genders are simply far more likely than Democrats of both genders to believe that women cry sexism in response to “innocent remarks or acts” and that America has “gone far enough on women’s rights.”

Secondly, this partisan divergence hints at the nature of the backlash that the current sexual-harassment reckoning will spark: Anti-feminist women will help to lead it.

In part, that’s because anti-feminist women can’t be labelled sexist as easily as anti-feminist men.

But it’s also because, given their conservative attitudes, many Republican women likely find the current disruption of gender relations unnerving.

… Feminist theorists have long sought to explain this.

In a recent essay, Marcie Bianco of the Clayman Institute for Gender Research at Stanford University cited Simone de Beauvoir’s argument that women are more likely than other oppressed groups to defend the hierarchies that subjugate them. [The essay then goes on to explain why this is so]…

In her 1983 book, Right-Wing Women, Andrea Dworkin argued that female anti-feminism was an understandable, if tragic, strategy of self-protection. “A woman,” she wrote, “acquiesces to male authority in order to gain some protection from male violence. She conforms in order to be as safe as she can be.”

Yes, some women feel safer or more comfortable staying in the prison.

Freedom and having to take full responsibility for one’s self, can be frightening, stressful or overwhelming; some woman may feel it’s much easier to foist all responsibility and cares in life on a husband. 

I think the studies and research cited in articles such as this one in The Atlantic can help shed light on how and why some women –

Such as Christina Hoff Sommers, the so-called ‘factual feminist,’ who conservative men like to quote, because she argues, among other things (paraphrasing her views), that sexism doesn’t exist, or feminists exaggerate sexism, and sexism a thing of the past,

Or, as with self-professing, every day Christian women who have come on to this blog to leave me comments accusing me of being a “misandrist,” such as Rachel Nichols –

-want to remain blind to sexism, insult any woman who openly discusses it…

  • Or, such women have a tendency to argue that there is no more sexism in the United States,
  • they may try to downplay sexism against women by suggesting women in other nations have life worse than American women, or,
  • they may try to downplay sexism against women (which is far more prevalent than sexism against men) by arguing that men also supposedly have things bad too – that misandry is a real thing, etc., and so on
    (see this page on this blog for more on all that).

Such women would apparently rather remain in the comfy, cozy, familiar, male-controlled cocoon where men, by and large, ultimately have all the power and get to control everything, including women and women’s choices (and I do not refer only or primarily to abortion here, which is moot for me anyway, as I am a pro-lifer).

Leaving that male-dominated cocoon just seems so scary – for the women who will even admit there is a cocoon; your “factual feminists” (who actually hate equality for women) want to deny there is a male-controlled cocoon in the first place, the very one where they – where complementarian or conservative “June Cleaver” women – like to nap and rest.

The male-dominated cocoon they’re residing in may be a prison, but it’s one they know and have come to grow accustomed to and don’t want to lose it.

What’s the expression about the ‘better the devil you know than the one you do not’?


More on this blog:

Let’s Say Good-Bye To The Straw-Feminist by Cordelia Fine

This Is Not About All Men. Don’t Make It About You.

Article by H. Farrell that Muses About the Possible Reasons For The Extreme Push Back Against Equality and Feminism, Particularly by Conservative Men

 Men Depicted as Victims Part 2 – “Depressed, Repressed, Objectified: Are Men the New Women?” by E. Day – Or: Is it Scientifically Plausible That Men Are Innately Dumber Than Women And Do Men Biologically Prefer to Fail School?

Women (and the men) Who Argue Against Feminism, Who Claim Men and Masculinity Are Under Attack, Or Who Insist That There is Little, to No, Sexism In The U.S.A.

 Men Depicted as Victims Part 2 – “Depressed, Repressed, Objectified: Are Men the New Women?” by E. Day – Or: Is it Scientifically Plausible That Men Are Innately Dumber Than Women And Do Men Biologically Prefer to Fail School?

The Anti-Feminism Conservative Bias – (written by a Conservative)

You Say You’re Against Victimhood Culture Yet You Depict All Men As Victims

Take It From A Woman Who Has Worked In Tech For 25 Years: This Is No Witch Hunt by Stacey Epstein

Christian Gender Complementarianism is Christian-Endorsed Codependency for Women (And That’s Not A Good Thing)

The Me Too Twitter Campaign and ‘Why Do Men Still React in Shock to Women’s Sexual Assault Stories?’ (editorials)

On Men Not Believing Women and Being Blind to the Sexism and Harassment Women Often Endure

A Study Used Sensors to Show That Men and Women Are Treated Differently at Work

Four Research-Based Solutions Beyond Mike Pence’s ‘Billy Graham Rule.’ by H G Scott

These Ideas About Sexual Attraction May Be Based on Shoddy Science by M W Moyer

The Psychology of Victim-Blaming by K. Roberts

Female Coders Are Rated More Highly Than Men – Except When People Know They’re Women

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