• Article by H. Farrell that Muses About the Possible Reasons For The Extreme Push Back Against Equality and Feminism, Particularly by Conservative Men

Article by H. Farrell that Muses About the Possible Reasons For The Extreme Push Back Against Equality and Feminism, Particularly by Conservative Men

I believe the following is also applicable to many conservative Christians and most Christian Gender Complementarians (with emphasis added by me at various points):

The “Intellectual Dark Web,” explained: what Jordan Peterson has in common with the alt-right

Snippets:

Bari Weiss, an opinion writer and editor at the New York Times, created a stir this week with a long article on a group that calls itself the “Intellectual Dark Web.”

The coinage referred to a loose collective of intellectuals and media personalities who believe they are “locked out” of mainstream media, in Weiss’s words, and who are building their own ways to communicate with readers.

…The truth is rather that dark web intellectuals, like Donald Trump supporters and the online alt-right, have experienced a sharp decline in their relative status over time. This is leading them to frustration and resentment.

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• The Enduring Appeal of Creepy Christianity by D. French

The Enduring Appeal of Creepy Christianity by D. French

This editorial summarizes many of the issues I have with Christianity. There are several factors that have been driving me from a conservative Christianity I was raised in all my life towards agnosticism, or maybe deism.

I haven’t completely rejected the Christian faith at this stage of life, but I’m finding it more and more difficult to stay, seeing how so many Christians do things like excuse, turn a blind eye to, or support child molesters, wife abusers, or support sexism (but they swear that they don’t; it’s just “biblical” to bar women from certain positions, due to their biological sex alone).

I’m a conservative, but I did not support politician Roy Moore and was thoroughly put off and disturbed to see other conservatives who were supporting the guy – he, as an adult, was hitting on teen-aged girls, which is not acceptable or moral.

The following editorial’s reason- for- being was that conservatives and Christians were supporting a known child predator (Moore) who was running for political office, but its points, or raison d’etre, are exploring the broader problems in regards to conservative evangelicalism and other forms of American Christianity.

Emphasis added to this by me:

The Enduring Appeal of Creepy Christianity by D. French

by David French

The desire for certainty in an uncertain world yields terrible results.

…This second temptation is pernicious. Theologically, it fundamentally denies a very uncomfortable scriptural truth: that this side of heaven we can’t eliminate uncertainty or temptation. We “see through a glass darkly.” We simply don’t have all the answers — for raising children, for sustaining a successful marriage, for thriving in our careers, or for responding to sickness and adversity.

The scriptural response to this fundamental uncertainty is unsatisfying to some. Faith, hope, and love are vague concepts.

The Bible doesn’t have a clear, specific prescription for every life challenge. But rather than seeking God prayerfully and with deep humility and reverence, we want answers, now. And thus we gravitate to those people who purport to offer more than the Bible.

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• A Critique of Kevin DeYoung’s Critique of Smith’s ‘The Bible Made Impossible,’ A Book About Evangelicals and Biblicism

 A Critique of Kevin DeYoung’s Critique of Smith’s ‘The Bible Made Impossible,’ A Book About Evangelicals and Biblicism

I wanted to make a few observations or criticisms of this critique by Kevin DeYoung of a book by Christian Smith:

A Catholic Laments the Evangelical Sin of “Biblicism”

Here’s what happened, as I understand it:

A few years ago, a Catholic guy named Christian Smith wrote a book called “The Bible Made Impossible,” where he discusses concepts for which he coined the terms “Biblicism” and P.I.P. (pervasive interpretive pluralism).

This book upset and ticked off a lot of Reformed and Protestant Christians who wrote reviews criticizing it out the ying yang, and you can find some of these reviews online.

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• A Letter to Pastors in the Age of #ChurchToo By Maggie Konstanski

A Letter to Pastors in the Age of #ChurchToo By Maggie Konstanski

A few highlights from that page:

… While I have personally found God’s redemption and love for women in these difficult biblical stories, I know countless women who remain frustrated and confused about how God views women.

… Women’s experiences with violence and marginalization inform how we read the Bible; how we relate to God; and how we interact with our brothers.

And for survivors of violence, the church’s unbiblical teachings on gender roles are confusing and harmful.

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• Non-Christians Twice as Likely to Seek Mental Health Counseling as Practicing Christians: Barna Study

The Barna Study is here:

Americans Feel Good About Counseling

Millions of Americans face mental illness each year, according to NAMI. Yet the stigma surrounding mental health is acutely felt—even in the Church, which has at times struggled in its messaging on the issue.

This is despite the fact that, according to new Barna data, Americans by far have positive experiences with counseling—a practice that helps them heal from trauma, facilitate mental health, build strong relationships and change destructive patterns of thinking.

In a new study, Barna wanted to know just how many American adults are engaging in counseling and how they feel about the practice.

The article about the study:

Non-Christians Twice as Likely to Seek Mental Health Counseling as Practicing Christians: Barna Study

By Michael Gryboski , Christian Post Reporter | Feb 28, 2018 11:01 AM

Non-Christians are more than twice as likely to acknowledge seeking counseling for mental health issues than practicing Christians, according to a recent study by the Barna Group.

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• Brain Injury And Phineas Gage

I had to read about Phineas Gage when I was in college – I believe I had to read about him in a psychology class I took.

After a metal rod went through his head, Gage’s personality was drastically altered (according to what I read in college).

One of a few reasons I find this an interesting story is that so many Christians give horrible advice to anyone who is suffering from a mental health disorder, that if they just pray hard enough, have enough faith, trust Jesus, or attend church weekly, that they will be healed of their mental health problems.

I wonder how such Christians would deal with Gage’s story? I doubt that his condition could’ve been changed from church attendance or Bible reading. Personal sin did not cause his issues.

Phineas Gage and the effect of an iron bar through the head on personality

The extraordinary case of Phineas Gage has been used and abused by neurologists and even the occasional creationist. Mo Costandi summarises what we know, and what we don’t

Phineas Gage – on Wikipedia

Phineas P. Gage (1823–1860) was an American railroad construction foreman remembered for his improbable[B1]:19 survival of an accident in which a large iron rod was driven completely through his head, destroying much of his brain’s left frontal lobe, and for that injury’s reported effects on his personality and behavior over the remaining 12 years of his life‍—‌effects sufficiently profound (for a time at least) that friends saw him as “no longer Gage”. [H]:14

…Phineas Gage influenced 19-century discussion about the mind and brain, par­tic­u­larly debate on cerebral local­i­za­tion, ​​[M]:ch7-9[B] and was perhaps the first case to suggest the brain’s role in deter­min­ing per­son­al­ity, and that damage to specific parts of the brain might induce specific per­son­al­ity changes.

Photo slide: View drawing of Gage’s brain trauma, with notations

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• How The Bible Can Be Damaging to People with Depression via Patheos Blog

How The Bible Can Be Damaging to People with Depression via Patheos Blog

This is a very good article, but I do have one minor disagreement with it (very minor). I’d like to discuss my area of disagreement, but I’ll do so below the link and excerpts.

How The Bible Can Be Damaging to People with Depression via Patheos Blog by Guest Contributor

Snippets:

As a teen, I read the entire Bible. Twice. Deuteronomy, with rules about weird sores on the body, 1 Chonicles and the list of who “begat” whom, and all. Not one verse helped.

I clung to verses of encouragement as I lay sobbing and screaming into pillows, wracked with internal pain. Hopeless. Pleading for God to help me, to deliver me. I could find only one verse that I identified with: “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?” (Matthew 27:45-46).

…“Just have a little more faith,” coach these verses and those who deliver them. “Just think more positively; just hope.” That’s the thing about depression, though: there is no hope.

Depression is characterized by a lack of hope. …

That’s where the verses can get dangerous, in the following three ways.

1) Bible verses keep us from seeking treatment.

When we believe that depression can be overcome by thought changes, we ignore the fact that clinical depression is a medical issue, an imbalance in brain chemistry.

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