• Act Normal: Memoir of a Stumbling Block by K. Burmeister

Act Normal: Memoir of a Stumbling Block by K. Burmeister

Act Normal: Memoir of a Stumbling Block

A horrifying and hopeful true story that holds Christian culture accountable for the ways it objectifies, vilifies, and sacrifices its daughters.

…. Not merely a thriller about being stalked, Act Normal raises important questions on the church, feminine sexuality—and most challengingly, how to be a peacemaker in a violent world when it comes at great cost.

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• Article by H. Farrell that Muses About the Possible Reasons For The Extreme Push Back Against Equality and Feminism, Particularly by Conservative Men

Article by H. Farrell that Muses About the Possible Reasons For The Extreme Push Back Against Equality and Feminism, Particularly by Conservative Men

I believe the following is also applicable to many conservative Christians and most Christian Gender Complementarians (with emphasis added by me at various points):

The “Intellectual Dark Web,” explained: what Jordan Peterson has in common with the alt-right

Snippets:

Bari Weiss, an opinion writer and editor at the New York Times, created a stir this week with a long article on a group that calls itself the “Intellectual Dark Web.”

The coinage referred to a loose collective of intellectuals and media personalities who believe they are “locked out” of mainstream media, in Weiss’s words, and who are building their own ways to communicate with readers.

…The truth is rather that dark web intellectuals, like Donald Trump supporters and the online alt-right, have experienced a sharp decline in their relative status over time. This is leading them to frustration and resentment.

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• The Enduring Appeal of Creepy Christianity by D. French

The Enduring Appeal of Creepy Christianity by D. French

This editorial summarizes many of the issues I have with Christianity. There are several factors that have been driving me from a conservative Christianity I was raised in all my life towards agnosticism, or maybe deism.

I haven’t completely rejected the Christian faith at this stage of life, but I’m finding it more and more difficult to stay, seeing how so many Christians do things like excuse, turn a blind eye to, or support child molesters, wife abusers, or support sexism (but they swear that they don’t; it’s just “biblical” to bar women from certain positions, due to their biological sex alone).

I’m a conservative, but I did not support politician Roy Moore and was thoroughly put off and disturbed to see other conservatives who were supporting the guy – he, as an adult, was hitting on teen-aged girls, which is not acceptable or moral.

The following editorial’s reason- for- being was that conservatives and Christians were supporting a known child predator (Moore) who was running for political office, but its points, or raison d’etre, are exploring the broader problems in regards to conservative evangelicalism and other forms of American Christianity.

Emphasis added to this by me:

The Enduring Appeal of Creepy Christianity by D. French

by David French

The desire for certainty in an uncertain world yields terrible results.

…This second temptation is pernicious. Theologically, it fundamentally denies a very uncomfortable scriptural truth: that this side of heaven we can’t eliminate uncertainty or temptation. We “see through a glass darkly.” We simply don’t have all the answers — for raising children, for sustaining a successful marriage, for thriving in our careers, or for responding to sickness and adversity.

The scriptural response to this fundamental uncertainty is unsatisfying to some. Faith, hope, and love are vague concepts.

The Bible doesn’t have a clear, specific prescription for every life challenge. But rather than seeking God prayerfully and with deep humility and reverence, we want answers, now. And thus we gravitate to those people who purport to offer more than the Bible.

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• A Critique of Kevin DeYoung’s Critique of Smith’s ‘The Bible Made Impossible,’ A Book About Evangelicals and Biblicism

 A Critique of Kevin DeYoung’s Critique of Smith’s ‘The Bible Made Impossible,’ A Book About Evangelicals and Biblicism

I wanted to make a few observations or criticisms of this critique by Kevin DeYoung of a book by Christian Smith:

A Catholic Laments the Evangelical Sin of “Biblicism”

Here’s what happened, as I understand it:

A few years ago, a Catholic guy named Christian Smith wrote a book called “The Bible Made Impossible,” where he discusses concepts for which he coined the terms “Biblicism” and P.I.P. (pervasive interpretive pluralism).

This book upset and ticked off a lot of Reformed and Protestant Christians who wrote reviews criticizing it out the ying yang, and you can find some of these reviews online.

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• Conservatives Are Wrong to Dismiss Feminism by S. Quinlan

I am a conservative who has been saying much of the same things this author says in this editorial (below). Too many other conservatives automatically discredit any and all arguments or concerns of feminists, in part because they wrongly conflate feminism with liberalism.

Even if it were true that all feminists are liberals (which is not the case), it does not stand that every point they raise is wrong.

I’ve also noticed for a long time now that a lot of conservatives misunderstand some of the terms or concepts feminists discuss.

I agree with about 99% of the following piece by S. Quinlan; there may be one or two points I do not fully agree with, however.

I was a lifelong Republican until a few years ago. I left the Republican party for several reasons, one of which is I do see double standards – Republicans really do not respect women; a lot of conservative men really are sexist (as are some of the women on the right, who at times pen editorials denying the barriers their own biological sex face).

I, however, cannot join the left or the Democratic Party, because they also adhere to sexist double standards, as well.

Conservatives Are Wrong to Dismiss Feminism

Snippets:

by S. Quinlan

Today’s feminists have some valid concerns, and those on the right would benefit from listening.

Last week, Representative Martha McSally (R., Ariz.) revealed that she had been sexually abused in high school by a coach. Her #MeToo story is a reminder that conservatism cannot afford to dismiss the modern feminist movement.

In the six months since the #MeToo movement began, conservatives have, at times rightly, questioned or criticized some aspects of it. But too often they have wrongly downplayed, ignored, or completely dismissed the impetus of the movement.

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• It’s Not Billy Graham Rule or Bust by T. H. Warren

It’s Not Billy Graham Rule or Bust by T. H. Warren

Snippets:

15 ways my husband and I guard our marriage while still loving our friends of the opposite sex.

by TISH HARRISON WARREN

With recent allegations of indiscretion against a prominent megachurch pastor, some Christian leaders have doubled down on the so-called Billy Graham Rule, which dictates that men and women should never meet alone.

 Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary president Danny Akin tweeted, “A valuable lesson we all can learn from this tragic situation: follow the @BillyGraham rule. If you are married, never be alone with someone of the opposite sex who is not your spouse. Never!”

This rule, in its most pristine form, renders male-female friendships impossible. However unintentionally, it communicates to women that they are fundamentally dangerous. And it bars men from meaningful mentorship or pastoral care of women and vice-versa.

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• Why Christians Can Do Better Than The “Billy Graham Rule” by T. Osterhouse

Why Christians Can Do Better Than The “Billy Graham Rule” by T. Osterhouse

Quote from the essay:

“The ‘Billy Graham Rule’ is well-intended, but it doesn’t address the heart issue of sexual sin & sexual abuse. It shifts the blame, reducing women to temptresses or objects. Women become the problem and men are safer without them.”

More (by T. Osterhouse):

…I understand the temptation to draw a line in the sand—anything to protect from doing something wrong in a vulnerable moment. Many also argue that the rule protects from even the appearance of evil, especially for people in high-profile ministry positions.

I believe that Graham’s rule is well-intended, but it does not address the heart-level issue of sexual sin or sexual abuse. It merely shifts the blame, reducing women to temptresses or objects. Women become the problem and men are safer without them. Consequently, men are excused from wrestling with and overcoming their own sin.

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