• Christians Combat Depression and Suicide Too; Pastors and Ministers share How They Get Through by J. Law

Christians combat depression and suicide too; pastors and ministers share how they get through by J. Law

Snippets:

The depression rate worldwide is on a continual rise and Christians are not immune.

With multiple headlines of pastors who died by suicide throughout the United States, The Christian Post decided to reach out to ministers to talk about how they combat their darkest moments.  

…Despite the increasing notice of depression and suicide nationally, the resources to help people in the church struggling with these thoughts or feelings are scarce.

According to the World Health Organization, depression at its worst leads to suicide and it affects 300 million people worldwide.

It’s estimated that 15 percent of people will experience depression at some point in their adult lives.

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• America Godless? Number of People with No Religion Soars (2019)

America Godless? Number of People with No Religion Soars (2019)

There are now as many Americans who claim no religion as there are evangelicals and Catholics, a survey finds

April 2019

“Religious nones,” as they are called by researchers, are a diverse group made up of atheists, agnostics, the spiritual, and those who are no specific organized religion in particular. A rejection of organized religion is the common thread they share.

…The meteoric rise of religious nones began in the early 1990s and has grown 266% since 1991, he [Burge] said.

Burge estimates that ‘No Religion’ will be the largest group outright in four to six years.

Experts still debate the factors behind this wave of Americans declaring no religion.

America Godless? Number of People with No Religion Soars

The number of Americans who identify as having no religion has risen 266 percent since 1991, to now tie statistically with the number of Catholics and Evangelicals, according to a new survey.

People with no religion – known as ‘nones’ among statisticians – account for 23.1 percent of the U.S. population, while Catholics make up 23 percent and Evangelicals account for 22.5 percent, according to the General Social Survey.

Those three groups now represent the largest the religious groups in America. 

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• These pastors were busted taking the ‘Prosperity Gospel’ to the extreme and bilking their followers out of millions by S. K. Burris

These pastors were busted taking the ‘Prosperity Gospel’ to the extreme and bilking their followers out of millions

Snippets:

by S. K. Burris

The worship of the almighty dollar is never more evident than with religious leaders who manage to work the system and avoid paying their taxes. For some pastors, faith in the prosperity gospel is stronger than the biblical gospels.

According to the Washington Post, fraud is thriving in U.S. churches, but it goes largely unreported either to church leaders or to the authorities.

…The late Rev. Dr. David B. Barrett partnered with the Center for the Study of Global Christianity to chart a statistical understanding of Christian churches around the world. Barrett “was a pioneer in collecting data on churches and noticed a significant increase in embezzlement fraud during the 1980’s,” Pavlo wrote.

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• Moms Are Influencing Children for Christ. Dads? Not So Much, Survey Finds by M. Foust

Moms Are Influencing Children for Christ. Dads? Not So Much, Survey Finds by M. Foust

Several years ago, I remember seeing a few complementarian authors on their sites or blogs publishing material claiming that fathers are more important than mothers in a family because some survey from the mid or late 1990s supposedly indicated that most children are led to Christ via the father’s spiritual involvement.

I always found that a curious argument, because in my own experience, and that I’ve seen in the lives of Christian women, it’s usually the mother who takes an interest in Bible reading at home, leading the children in prayer, and making sure the family goes to church each Sunday.

The men just want to sit in their recliners watching NFL all day, if the wife didn’t force them to go to church.

But now, as of 2019, there is this:

Moms Are Influencing Children for Christ. Dads? Not So Much, Survey Finds

March 22, 2019

by Michael Foust

Christians are far more likely to say their mothers had a bigger influence on their faith than did their fathers, according to a new Barna study that examines the roles that moms and dads play in the development of children.

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• Hello, Complementarian Greg Morse of Desiring God Site: Actress Says (Vintage) Disney Films Made Her Question Her Sexuality When She Was a Kid

Hello, Complementarian Greg Morse of Desiring God Site: Actress Says (Vintage) Disney Films Made Her Question Her Sexuality When She Was a Kid

This is too funny.

Just a couple of weeks ago, complementarian Greg Morse of the “Desiring God” site wrote a moronic essay lamenting how women in contemporary Disney films – such as Brie Larson in “Captain Marvel” – are moving away from playing the usual passive Disney Princess types of decades past.

Those very same sort of women characters who were nothing but accessories to the male characters in the movies.

Morse thinks that Disney women characters of yester-year are ideal feminine prototypes for women of today.

(Note: Complementarianism takes its cues from secular culture, as I’ve said in months past on this blog and at others.

Complementarianism is a capitulation to culture, because our culture has always been patriarchal. Complementarianism is not counter-cultural, it’s cultural.

But Complementarians insist that they are following the “Bible only,” while they argue that Christian Gender Egalitarians are “capitulating to culture.”)

Well, well, well.

Now we have actress Cara Delevingne saying that some of those very same depictions of women (and of men) in older Disney movies caused her to question her sexuality, to the point she is now “gender fluid.”

Here’s a link to that:

[Movie Actress] Cara Delevingne Says Watching Disney Films As A Child Made Her Question Her Sexuality

Does Morse still want to point to older Disney movies as ideals women should be emulating today, after seeing headlines such as that one?

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• Is Complementarianism Merely Personal Conviction? by C. Schatz

Is Complementarianism Merely Personal Conviction? by C. Schatz

Is Complementarianism Merely Personal Conviction?

A selection from that page:

August 2008

This post is a response to Randy Stinson’s article titled Is Complementarianism a Merely Personal Conviction?

In Randy Stinson’s article it appears that there is a lot of fear that comes through even to the point of suggesting that if one is an egalitarian they will be affected negatively for their entire life, even to the extent that they may not remain in the Christian faith.

  I would like to unpack some of the key points of Randy Stinson’s article to look at the underlying message to see how it brings a divisiveness into the body of Christ.  …

1.  The authority of scripture is at stake.

Mr. Stinson greatly overstates his case in this point and draws the reader to the conclusion that egalitarians do not hold to the authority of God’s word.

While he says that the Bible “clearly” teaches that men and women have distinct and complementary roles in the home and the church he does not mention the fact that a growing number of evangelical Christians who strongly hold to the authority of scripture read the hard passages of scripture in their context and see something that is not so “clear” at all that there are differing spiritual roles for men and women.

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• When Your Child Is Struggling With Suicidal Thoughts, Simply ‘More Faith’ Isn’t the Answer by S. Lynn

When Your Child Is Struggling With Suicidal Thoughts, Simply ‘More Faith’ Isn’t the Answer by S. Lynn

When Your Child Is Struggling With Suicidal Thoughts, Simply ‘More Faith’ Isn’t the Answer by S. Lynn

Snippets:

Kelly Rosati has four adopted children. Three of them have a serious mental illness. And one thing she doesn’t like to hear is that her problems would be solved if her faith was stronger.

“This idea that as Christians, if we were just spiritual enough, that somehow Christianity teaches we wouldn’t experience these things — I’ve seen so many people suffer and have their faith crumble because of those lies,” Rosati said in an interview with Saddleback Church co-founder Kay Warren this week.  

After Rosati and her husband, John, were unable to have their own children, the couple began the adoption journey through the foster care system.

Several of her children were born addicted to drugs or exposed to alcohol in utero, she said. Among her four children, three have dealt with suicidality. One has bipolar disorder and another has schizophrenia.

Her children have been in and out of emergency rooms and residential psychiatric care facilities. One, the youngest, is currently at a residential facility.

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