• Act Normal: Memoir of a Stumbling Block by K. Burmeister

Act Normal: Memoir of a Stumbling Block by K. Burmeister

Act Normal: Memoir of a Stumbling Block

A horrifying and hopeful true story that holds Christian culture accountable for the ways it objectifies, vilifies, and sacrifices its daughters.

…. Not merely a thriller about being stalked, Act Normal raises important questions on the church, feminine sexuality—and most challengingly, how to be a peacemaker in a violent world when it comes at great cost.

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• The Enduring Appeal of Creepy Christianity by D. French

The Enduring Appeal of Creepy Christianity by D. French

This editorial summarizes many of the issues I have with Christianity. There are several factors that have been driving me from a conservative Christianity I was raised in all my life towards agnosticism, or maybe deism.

I haven’t completely rejected the Christian faith at this stage of life, but I’m finding it more and more difficult to stay, seeing how so many Christians do things like excuse, turn a blind eye to, or support child molesters, wife abusers, or support sexism (but they swear that they don’t; it’s just “biblical” to bar women from certain positions, due to their biological sex alone).

I’m a conservative, but I did not support politician Roy Moore and was thoroughly put off and disturbed to see other conservatives who were supporting the guy – he, as an adult, was hitting on teen-aged girls, which is not acceptable or moral.

The following editorial’s reason- for- being was that conservatives and Christians were supporting a known child predator (Moore) who was running for political office, but its points, or raison d’etre, are exploring the broader problems in regards to conservative evangelicalism and other forms of American Christianity.

Emphasis added to this by me:

The Enduring Appeal of Creepy Christianity by D. French

by David French

The desire for certainty in an uncertain world yields terrible results.

…This second temptation is pernicious. Theologically, it fundamentally denies a very uncomfortable scriptural truth: that this side of heaven we can’t eliminate uncertainty or temptation. We “see through a glass darkly.” We simply don’t have all the answers — for raising children, for sustaining a successful marriage, for thriving in our careers, or for responding to sickness and adversity.

The scriptural response to this fundamental uncertainty is unsatisfying to some. Faith, hope, and love are vague concepts.

The Bible doesn’t have a clear, specific prescription for every life challenge. But rather than seeking God prayerfully and with deep humility and reverence, we want answers, now. And thus we gravitate to those people who purport to offer more than the Bible.

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• Why Christians Can Do Better Than The “Billy Graham Rule” by T. Osterhouse

Why Christians Can Do Better Than The “Billy Graham Rule” by T. Osterhouse

Quote from the essay:

“The ‘Billy Graham Rule’ is well-intended, but it doesn’t address the heart issue of sexual sin & sexual abuse. It shifts the blame, reducing women to temptresses or objects. Women become the problem and men are safer without them.”

More (by T. Osterhouse):

…I understand the temptation to draw a line in the sand—anything to protect from doing something wrong in a vulnerable moment. Many also argue that the rule protects from even the appearance of evil, especially for people in high-profile ministry positions.

I believe that Graham’s rule is well-intended, but it does not address the heart-level issue of sexual sin or sexual abuse. It merely shifts the blame, reducing women to temptresses or objects. Women become the problem and men are safer without them. Consequently, men are excused from wrestling with and overcoming their own sin.

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• Tammie Jo Shults, a Former Navy Fighter Pilot, Safely Brought the Plane to Land After the Explosion at 32,000 Ft

Tammie Jo Shults, a Former Navy Fighter Pilot, Safely Brought the Plane to Land After the Explosion at 32,000 Ft

Yet another example of another woman who does not fit the Christian gender complementarian (i.e., sexist) idea of what it means to be a woman, or the complementarian assumption of what and how God designed women to be and do.

Tammie Jo Shults, a Former Navy Fighter Pilot, Safely Brought the Plane to Land After the Explosion at 32,000 Ft

19 April 2018

By Hannah Parry and Jennifer Smith For Dailymail.com

-‘So we have a part of the aircraft missing’: Extraordinary moment hero ex-Navy fighter pilot calmly told air traffic control how the engine exploded on her Southwest Airlines flight – before landing it and saving more than 100 passengers

-The engine exploded on the Boeing 737-700 and sent shrapnel flying back towards the passenger window

-Tammie Jo Shults, a former Navy fighter pilot, safely brought the plane to land after the explosion at 32,000ft

-This is a true American Hero,’ wrote one of the passengers aboard the plane, ‘God bless her and all the crew’

-Jennifer Riordan, a mother-of-two from Albuquerque, was rushed to hospital after the crash but later died

-It was a flight from New York to Dallas but the female pilot was forced to make an emergency landing

 -Passengers filmed themselves as the oxygen masks descended and as they said goodbye to their loved ones

The heroic pilot who calmly landed a Southwest Airlines flight after a midair explosion caused a woman to be nearly sucked out of the aircraft, leaving one dead, has been identified.

Tammie Jo Shults, a former Navy fighter pilot and one of the first women to fly an F-18, quickly brought the Dallas-bound Southwest Flight 1380 to land at Philadelphia International at 11.30am after the explosion at 32,000ft.

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• Pastors in Drag, Russell Moore, & Biblical Manhood: The Fruit Test from Tic Toc Ministries

It’s been quite some time since I last visited the site I am linking you to here. I don’t remember all of the blogger’s positions on every subject, so a link to this post of theirs below is not necessarily an endorsement of all views on their blog.

I don’t  agree totally with every single point the author makes in the following post, but she makes many great points demonstrating how flawed Christian gender complementarianism is:

Pastors in Drag, Russell Moore, & Biblical Manhood: The Fruit Test from Tic Toc Ministries

Snippets:

BY M. DENNINGTON

Complementarians want to tell you how to be a real man…and now, it’s getting personal.

These experts on “Biblical Manhood” are questioning yours – even if you say you agree with them.

Today Jesus is going to give you a simple test to find out if these are leaders you should follow.

Are these men Biblical examples of “real manhood”?

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• The Anti-Feminism Conservative Bias – (written by a Conservative)

The Anti-Feminism Conservative Bias (written by a Conservative)

I’m a conservative. I’ve never been a liberal in my entire life.

I used to be a Republican, too; now, I am not affiliated with any political group.

I keep noticing in critiques about feminism (which is generally of liberal, secular, feminism, but can be of feminism in general by conservatives and others) is that there is a bias- there is an anti-feminism bias percolating under the editorials and papers I’m seeing.

However, those writing these anti-feminism pieces pretend as though they themselves have no bias, but they argue that feminists have a bias, which therefore means that feminist commentary or research cannot or should not be trusted.

Anyone who criticizes feminism or feminist theory – and usually, but not always, these individuals are conservative themselves, or are quoted favorably by conservatives who hate feminism – depicts themselves as being purely factual, seeking only to repeat scientific facts, without an agenda.

Furthermore, these anti-feminism conservatives like to portray any and all feminists (or those, like me, who aren’t feminist but who agree with some of their positions) as being blinded by an agenda, too emotional, not rational or logical enough, and as being too prejudiced to be objective.

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• Non-Christians Twice as Likely to Seek Mental Health Counseling as Practicing Christians: Barna Study

The Barna Study is here:

Americans Feel Good About Counseling

Millions of Americans face mental illness each year, according to NAMI. Yet the stigma surrounding mental health is acutely felt—even in the Church, which has at times struggled in its messaging on the issue.

This is despite the fact that, according to new Barna data, Americans by far have positive experiences with counseling—a practice that helps them heal from trauma, facilitate mental health, build strong relationships and change destructive patterns of thinking.

In a new study, Barna wanted to know just how many American adults are engaging in counseling and how they feel about the practice.

The article about the study:

Non-Christians Twice as Likely to Seek Mental Health Counseling as Practicing Christians: Barna Study

By Michael Gryboski , Christian Post Reporter | Feb 28, 2018 11:01 AM

Non-Christians are more than twice as likely to acknowledge seeking counseling for mental health issues than practicing Christians, according to a recent study by the Barna Group.

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