• Why Complementarian Women Are Complementarian – And: When Women Enforce Complementarianism

Why Complementarian Women Are Complementarian – And: When Women Enforce Complementarianism

There are several reasons why a Christian woman might become a complementarian.

I will present a link much farther below (from Cult News site) that discusses how and why some Christian women pressure other Christian women to conform to sexist complementarian teachings.

I am an ex-complementarian.

Some women, such as myself, were born into complementarianism.

I was brought up in a Christian family that attended Southern Baptist churches, Southern Baptist churches endorse complementarianism, and my mother was always bringing in Christian-based magazines and other literature into the home, which stressed very traditional gender roles.

(When I was a kid growing up Southern Baptist, I don’t recall the Southern Baptists of the 1970s, or even the 1980s, being as nearly obsessed and insistent upon traditional gender roles as they started to become in the 1990s and later.)

If you become a Christian, and you love God, and you believe that God is your BFF (your bestie), you naturally want to live in such a way that is pleasing to God.

Your church and your parents are telling you that complementarianism is pleasing to God.

Furthermore, complementarianism is conflated with codependent attitudes and behavior by its adherents.

When you are a complementarian, you are taught by complementarians that your only alternative to complementarianism is to become an evil, icky, un-biblical, liberal secular feminist.

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• Southern Baptists Are Having To Defend Themselves Against the Accusation That They’re Becoming Feminists

Southern Baptists Are Having To Defend Themselves Against the Accusation That They’re Becoming Feminists

One of the mis-givings I have with being a conservative is sitting back and watching other conservatives automatically reject any and all grievances raised by secular or Christian feminists (and doing so without honestly weighing if the feminist points have merit or not), or to associate seeking justice and equality for women with extreme, militant feminism, and therefore rejecting it out-right.

There is nothing anti- conservative, or un-biblical, with conservatives, Republicans, Christians, or with anyone, noticing that sexism exists and seeking to rectify the situation and to ensure that girls and women are treated with respect, and given equality of opportunity.

The Southern Baptists Dumped a Predator or Two, but Let’s Hold Off on the F-word

Jul 16, 2018, 1:54pm Anne Linstatter

The #metoo and #churchtoo movements have put SBC leaders on the defensive, as earlier revelations of widespread child sexual abuse by priests did to the all-male Roman Catholic hierarchy. Yet both groups continue to deny that there could be any connection between all-male power and the sexual abuse of women and children.

What a hoot! Southern Baptists are having to defend themselves against the accusation that they’re becoming feminists.

What have they done to deserve this F-word? They’ve kicked out the president of a seminary for counseling victims of domestic violence to keep quiet, and for telling at least one rape victim to forgive her assailant and not report to police. They dethroned a few other predator pastors and confessed to past failures to protect the weak.

This counts as feminism?

I’d simply call it justice regardless of gender—which, by the way, actually is the definition of feminism.

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• Religious Trauma Syndrome and the (Negative) Effects of Religion on Mental Health

Religious Trauma Syndrome and the (Negative) Effects of Religion on Mental Health

Several years ago, atheist Richard Dawkins made some kind of comment about any and all religion being taught to a child by his or her parents as being a form of “child abuse.” That Dawkins did not offer any caveats or qualifiers to that comment made it seem very obnoxious to me.

I personally do not think that all religion, or belief in a deity is always, or necessarily, or by default, detrimental. It would depend on the particulars involved.

There are many conservative (and possibly some progressive) Christians who would have an automatic negative response to a post such as this one, if they believe it includes Christianity.

Yet, these same Christians (the conservatives especially) would not hesitate to recognize and acknowledge the negative, harmful ramifications of Satanism, militant Islam, or some types of atheist worldviews. They seem hesitant to admit that those who wear the same label as themselves – “Christian” – also at times express repulsive views or practice abuse.

RTS – Religious Trauma Syndrome

I believe this is Winell’s site – or Dr. Darrel Ray’s:

Recovering From Religion

Podcast: Living After Faith

Dr. Marlene Winell joins us for a discussion of Religious Trauma Syndrome and PTSD. Valerie Tarico’s interview with Dr. Winnell. Journey Free Dr. Marlene Winnell’s

The Health Effects of Leaving Religion

…Not every recent deconvert necessarily needs these resources, though. Some who leave religion become healthier than they were before. This was the case for Annie Erlandson.

…Other negative health behaviors sometimes associated with being religious, according to social psychologist Dr. Clay Routledge in Psychology Today, are cognitive dissonance (consistent religious doubts can harm your health) and avoidant coping.

An example of the latter is the attitude that things are “all in God’s hands,” which could potentially keep people from taking action on behalf of their own health.

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• The No True Scotsman and Christians’ Version of Atheism – Regarding Christian Deconversion

 The No True Scotsman and Christians’ Version of Atheism – Regarding Christian Deconversion

I have been thinking about doing a post – or series of posts – about deconversion from Christianity.

I do not identify as an atheist, but am somewhere between being a Christian and being agnostic (or possibly a deist).

I see Christians routinely mishandle how they discuss or talk to people who have left the Christian faith (or who may be considering leaving it).

One of the most common – and annoying and disrespectful – approaches they use when talking to or about someone who has left the faith is to say the person was never a “real” Christian to begin with.

This may or may not be accompanied by the No True Scotsman Fallacy, where an ex-Christian or a doubter may point to all the hypocrisy or abuse committed by self-professing believers, and the Christian will retort by saying “thus and so was not a “real” Christian,” or, “so and so who is now an atheist was never a ‘real’ Christian'”

Here is a blog post, hosted on an atheist or agnostic blog, about this (there are maybe one or two points in this essay I am not in complete agreement with, but most of this is spot on):

The No True Scotsman and Christians’ Version of Atheism

Snippets:

by Captain Cassidy

…Everyone, Meet the Scotsman. He’s Very True.

The No True Scotsman is a logical fallacy. Technically, it’s an ad hoc reinterpretation of a situation to prevent contradictions and refutations of one’s position. As that link reveals, it’s also a circular argument.

Christians adore it. Within their own culture, it’s a devastating way to quickly negate a fellow Christian. They also use it to dismiss and invalidate ex-Christians.

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• Women Saw #MeToo Coming 100 Years Ago. When Will We Listen? by K. K. DuMez

Women Saw #MeToo Coming 100 Years Ago. When Will We Listen?

In the course of this work, [Christian author] Bushnell was startled to discover that it was often Christian men who were guilty of perpetrating horrific violence against women.

Equally troubling, she discovered that “respectable” Christian men and women all too frequently condoned that violence, blaming the victim or simply looking the other way.

… Bushnell was ultimately compelled to ask: Is Christian theology to blame?

Searching the Scriptures, she was drawn to passages supporting traditional notions of male headship.

… what puzzled Bushnell was that men who purported to follow Christ—the incarnate God who emptied himself and submitted to death on a cross—did so by claiming power over women.

As she understood the gospel message, only a sinner would wish “to exalt himself and have dominion over others”—and he would do so “in exact proportion to the degree of selfishness in his heart.”

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• Wm. Paul Young on Women, Ephesians 5:22 & 1 Timothy 2:12

Wm. Paul Young on Women, Ephesians 5:22 & 1 Timothy 2:12

Video on You Tube

Wm. Paul Young on Women, Ephesians 5:22 & 1 Timothy 2:12


More:

The Handmaidens Conspiracy: How Erroneous Bible Translations Obscured the Women’s Empowerment Movement STARTED by JESUS CHRIST by D. L. Howell

Conservatives Are Wrong to Dismiss Feminism by S. Quinlan

Christian Gender Complementarianism is Christian-Endorsed Codependency for Women (And That’s Not A Good Thing)

Let’s Say Good-Bye To The Straw-Feminist by Cordelia Fine

• Gender Complementarianism Contributes to Gender Confusion

 Gender Complementarianism Contributes to Gender Confusion

In the past year or so, I’ve seen headlines go through my social media feed indicating that Christian gender complementarians believe that not only can complementarianism fight abortion, high divorce rates, and everything in between, but they believe that complementarianism – strictly defined and enforced gender roles – is the solution for gender confusion.

I guess under “gender confusion” they mainly have in mind transgenderism and maybe the concept of gender fluidity.

Rather than clarify matters, gender complementarianism creates gender confusion.

First of all, who or what says what is masculine or what is feminine?

Many complementarians – and people in secular culture – seem to define behaviors such as watching NFL football or assertiveness as being “masculine.”

But I have a female friend and an Aunt, both hetero women, who like football. So who says football is inherently masculine? Or that only men can or should enjoy it?

I used to work with a man who hated NFL and most sports. He told me he loathed being around guys who were sports-heads and never discussed anything but. And he was a “straight” guy (he later married a woman and had a son with her).

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