• Are Facts More Important than Feelings? Ben Shapiro, Rationality, and Gender Stereotypes

Are Facts More Important than Feelings? Ben Shapiro, Rationality, and Gender Stereotypes

Ben Shapiro is a conservative pundit who Tweets quite a bit, and he’s sometimes interviewed on cable news programs. He frequently likes telling liberals something along the lines of “facts don’t care about your feelings.”

I’m a conservative myself. Yes, I know that some liberals on some subjects can allow emotion out-weigh reason. That is true.

However, I’m not a supporter of this tendency of some people – usually conservatives and men who uphold sexist gender stereotypes – to trash talk emotions. I do not support the false dichotomy of Fact Vs. Feeling (or Logic Vs. Emotions or Rationality Vs. Emotions).

A person can be logical, factual, rational AND have emotions and show those emotions in a debate. There’s nothing mutually exclusive about it.

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• The End of Empathy by Hanna Rosin

The End of Empathy

This issues discussed in this article remind me of this Bible verse:

Because of the increase of wickedness, the love of most will grow cold…

The End Of Empathy by Hanna Rosin

Snippets:

…Americans these days seem to be losing their appetite for empathy, especially the walk-a-mile-in-someone’s-shoes Easter Sunday morning kind.

…Konrath [associate professor and researcher at Indiana University] collected decades of studies and noticed a very obvious pattern.

Starting around 2000, the line starts to slide.

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• Being Rational All the Time Isn’t Going to Do You Any Favors by Zat Rana

Being Rational All the Time Isn’t Going to Do You Any Favors by Zat Rana

Being Rational All the Time Isn’t Going to Do You Any Favors by Zat Rana

Snippets from that article:

….They [Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky] had discovered that contrary to the model of decision-making espoused by modern economic theory, in real life, humans didn’t make rational decisions based on outcome, but rather, they thought in terms of gains and losses using mental heuristics that often led them to sub-optimal choices.

In short, we are irrational agents by nature, and it tends to get in our way.

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• Christians Combat Depression and Suicide Too; Pastors and Ministers share How They Get Through by J. Law

Christians combat depression and suicide too; pastors and ministers share how they get through by J. Law

Snippets:

The depression rate worldwide is on a continual rise and Christians are not immune.

With multiple headlines of pastors who died by suicide throughout the United States, The Christian Post decided to reach out to ministers to talk about how they combat their darkest moments.  

…Despite the increasing notice of depression and suicide nationally, the resources to help people in the church struggling with these thoughts or feelings are scarce.

According to the World Health Organization, depression at its worst leads to suicide and it affects 300 million people worldwide.

It’s estimated that 15 percent of people will experience depression at some point in their adult lives.

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• It’s Not Self Pity When It’s Happening To You – RE: Classifying Other People’s Life’s Pain Derogatorily as “Self Pity”

It’s Not Self Pity When It’s Happening To You – Re: Classifying Other People’s Life’s Pain Derogatorily as “Self Pity”

This has become a very big pet peeve of mine in the last few years.

There are people out there, who, if you go to them when you’re undergoing a rough patch in your life, seeking empathy or encouragement – say,  after the death of a family member, or what have you – they will later refer to this behavior of yours insultingly as “self pity.”

I have run into two people so far in the last few years who have classified my struggles as being “self pity,” with one of these people engaging in that behavior herself, but of course, she does not regard herself writing to me about being stressed or hurting as “self pity,” no.

I’ve also seen people on other sites refer to other people’s struggle to cope with depression, grief, job loss, or what have you, with the phrase “self pity.”

I am not convinced that any and all negative reactions to hurt, pain, and anxiety in life is always “self pity.” I think it’s often not self pity.

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• Why So Many Americans Are Turning to Buddhism by Olga Khazan

Why So Many Americans Are Turning to Buddhism by Olga Khazan

I find the timing of this article by Khazan in The Atlantic (linked to much farther below in this post) so interesting.

I just came across this article a few days ago, and for the last few months, I’ve been thinking about researching Buddhism more, and maybe taking up some of its practices.

(I do not intend on becoming a full-blown Buddhist, or identifying as a Buddhist, even if I may adopt some of its practices. I’m still at the research phase right now. Perhaps I will decide to have nothing to do with Buddhism after I look into things more. I don’t know.)

I once saw a documentary about singer Tina Turner a couple of years ago (yes, that Tina Turner).

According to this documentary, Turner was raised in Christianity but later converted to Buddhism in adulthood, when she was facing a lot of struggles, if I recall correctly. Her Wiki page says she practices Nichiren Buddhism.

I am interested in any practical teachings Buddhism may have, such as meditation, in dealing with things like anxiety.

I found no help in the Christian faith for anxiety and other problems I’ve had over the course of my life, which I wrote about in more detail in this post.

I was a very conservative, devout, run of the mill Christian from my childhood up to my 40s, and not only did Christianity not alleviate my problems, but it exacerbated some of them.

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• Nine Ways Therapists Personally Deal With Grief by A. Drucker

Nine Ways Therapists Personally Deal With Grief

Nine Ways Therapists Personally Deal With Grief

Snippets (I’m not going to reproduce all nine steps from their page on my blog):

From a death to a job loss to an ended relationship, here’s how experts handle loss.

By Ali Drucker

While there’s no right way to grieve, there are a number of strategies that can help you get through loss.

When you think of grief, the first thing that comes to mind is likely mourning the death of a loved one. But grief can surface around any major life transition, like ending a relationship, dealing with an illness, or even losing a job.

As Melissa Fisher Goldman, a licensed clinical social worker and member of the Association of Death Education and Counseling puts it, “we don’t get over grief; we get through it.”

For a little help getting through it, HuffPost chatted with Goldman and other therapists for practical advice on how they personally deal with grief. Here’s how they handle it:

Allow Yourself To Cry

This method may be obvious, but it’s important to point out. Danielle Forshee, a licensed clinical social worker in New Jersey, said that during times of grief, she makes an effort not to suppress her tears.

There’s actually some science that supports the benefits of a good, cathartic sob.

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