• Empowering Kids In An Anxious World by C. Turner

Empowering Kids In An Anxious World by C. Turner

Empowering Kids In An Anxious World by C. Turner

Snippets:

Rates of anxiety and depression among teens in the U.S. have been rising for years. According to one study, nearly one in three adolescents (ages 13-18) now meets the criteria for an anxiety disorder, and in the latest results from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 32 percent of teens reported persistent feelings of sadness or hopelessness.

And there’s more bad news, grown-ups: The authors of two new parenting books believe you’re part of the problem.

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• Conquering Shame and Codependency – book by Darlene Lancer

Conquering Shame and Codependency – book by Darlene Lancer

I’ve only read excerpts from the book Conquering Shame and Codependency by Darlene Lancer, but it looks to be an interesting and maybe helpful read.

I come from a family that was heavily shame-based. My father in particular was very much into shaming my mother, siblings, and myself.

And I come from a devout Christian family – being devout Christians who regularly attended church – did nothing to halt that shaming, the hyper-criticism, the negativity.

The following material also touches on other subject matter in the midst of discussing shame and codependency, such as domestic violence and introversion.

Here are links about the book by Lancer, or links to interviews with Lancer:

Darlene Lancer’s site (with a lot of material about codependency)

Podcast: Darlene Lancer Talks Autonomy and Codependency on Mental Health News Radio

In new book, expert on codependency traces its roots in shame

Podcasts of Interviews with Lancer on Sound Cloud

Lancer Sound Cloud Podcasts

Topics on that page:

Symptoms of Codependency – Coping with Emptiness

Overcoming Codependent Guilt

Interview about Shame and Codependency

Toxic Shame | Guest Author Darlene Lancer

Snippets:

Martha Rosenberg: What are some of the ways children experience and incorporate shame during their childhoods?

Darlene Lancer:  Parents can shame their children’s needs, feelings and even interests. For example, if a child is told not to cry and “you’re a big boy now,” his need for comfort when he is in distress will be shamed.

A PBS program showed how different mothers of distressed 2-year-olds reacted. Some did not hold or even look at their children, probably because they were not comforted themselves as children.

If a child displays an interest in sports or culture or music and the parents do not approve of it, his interests can be shamed.

… Martha Rosenberg: You have also said that codependency is a progressive disease like alcoholism that leads to physical symptoms including chronic pain and final feelings of being “dead” inside. Can you describe some of your clients’ recoveries from shame and codependency?

Darlene Lancer: One of my clients was married to someone who was very verbally abusive to her. He was clever, manipulative and kept her in a “one down” position.

She tolerated the abuse because it resonated with feelings of worthlessness and weakness she had formed about herself when she was growing up.

Under a barrage of criticism, she would just freeze and not be able to find words to defend herself. She believed her own needs were selfish.

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• Religious Trauma Syndrome and the (Negative) Effects of Religion on Mental Health

Religious Trauma Syndrome and the (Negative) Effects of Religion on Mental Health

Several years ago, atheist Richard Dawkins made some kind of comment about any and all religion being taught to a child by his or her parents as being a form of “child abuse.” That Dawkins did not offer any caveats or qualifiers to that comment made it seem very obnoxious to me.

I personally do not think that all religion, or belief in a deity is always, or necessarily, or by default, detrimental. It would depend on the particulars involved.

There are many conservative (and possibly some progressive) Christians who would have an automatic negative response to a post such as this one, if they believe it includes Christianity.

Yet, these same Christians (the conservatives especially) would not hesitate to recognize and acknowledge the negative, harmful ramifications of Satanism, militant Islam, or some types of atheist worldviews. They seem hesitant to admit that those who wear the same label as themselves – “Christian” – also at times express repulsive views or practice abuse.

RTS – Religious Trauma Syndrome

I believe this is Winell’s site – or Dr. Darrel Ray’s:

Recovering From Religion

Podcast: Living After Faith

Dr. Marlene Winell joins us for a discussion of Religious Trauma Syndrome and PTSD. Valerie Tarico’s interview with Dr. Winnell. Journey Free Dr. Marlene Winnell’s

The Health Effects of Leaving Religion

…Not every recent deconvert necessarily needs these resources, though. Some who leave religion become healthier than they were before. This was the case for Annie Erlandson.

…Other negative health behaviors sometimes associated with being religious, according to social psychologist Dr. Clay Routledge in Psychology Today, are cognitive dissonance (consistent religious doubts can harm your health) and avoidant coping.

An example of the latter is the attitude that things are “all in God’s hands,” which could potentially keep people from taking action on behalf of their own health.

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• Baking Can Ease Depression

Baking Can Ease Depression

British movement uses baking to fight depression, mental health issues

Feeling Depressed? Maybe You Need to Knead

Psychologists Explain The Benefits Of Baking For Other People

Can baking make you happier?

5 Reasons Baking is Good for Mental Health

Therapists Now Encourage Cooking and Baking as Cures for Depression

Snippets:

A new report in the Wall Street Journal explores the development that therapists and mental health professionals in clinics across America have been instituting cooking and baking classes as a means to help people who suffer with depression.

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• 26 ‘Habits’ Of People With Depression by Sarah Schuster

26 ‘Habits’ Of People With Depression by Sarah Schuster

26 ‘Habits’ Of People With Depression

And because depression affects everyone differently, these little habits are different for everyone, too.

Apr 14, 2017
Written by Sarah Schuster

While depression can be in some ways the absence of action, there are still little habits, little routines, a person may pick up on when they re-enter a depressive episode.

These habits can be small indicators you’re beginning to feel depressed again.

They can even be positive things — habits developed to help you survive. And because depression affects everyone differently, these little habits are different for everyone, too.

To find out what habits people developed when they were experiencing depression, The Mighty asked their mental health community to share one thing they do when they’re depressed.

Here’s what they told us:

1. “I turn into a hermit. I just want to stay in my home and not go anywhere or see anyone. It’s my safe haven, and I just don’t want to leave it.” — Deanne R.

2. “Avoid everything. I ignore my phone, skip appointments or plans, don’t leave my house, stop paying bills, try to avoid talking to anyone. I’ve totally screwed up my life this way ― failed classes in college because I couldn’t leave my room.” — Sarah S.

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• Practical Advice on How to Help A Depressed (Possibly Suicidal) Friend by C. Madden, PhD

Practical Advice on How to Help A Depressed (Possibly Suicidal) Friend by C. Madden, PhD

Practical Advice on How to Help A Depressed (Possibly Suicidal) Friend by C. Madden, PhD

Snippets:

Robin Williams. Kate Spade. Now Anthony Bourdain.

Just three of many celebrities who have committed suicide recently.

While our hearts ache for those we loved from afar, the problem isn’t limited to the rich and famous. Statistically, death by suicide has risen by 25% since the year 1999, and suicide is in the top ten causes of death in the United States. It’s an epidemic.

As a therapist, I’m deeply concerned about this quickly escalating mental health crisis. If you yourself aren’t personally struggling with depression, I’m quite sure you know someone who is. That’s why I’m offering this practical advice on what to do when someone you love becomes depressed.

Don’t Pretend to Understand if You Don’t

Yes, you’ve been sad, but sadness is not depression. Depression isn’t being sad. If you haven’t struggled with real depression, you don’t understand.

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• Inappropriate Responses or Attitudes Towards Suicide Victims

Inappropriate Responses or Attitudes Towards Suicide Victims

TLDR = A summary of sorts of what follows below:

It’s the oddest thing: people who write editorials about people who have suicidal thoughts or about people who died from suicide claim to find suicide sad or upsetting, and they claim to have compassion for those with suicidal ideation, but they go on in their articles to insult and demean those very same people by calling them selfish, cowards, or what have you.


When a famous person kills him or herself, it’s common for commentators to rush out of the wood work to shame, scold, or criticize the person and offer up all manner of horrid advice on how said suicide could’ve been averted.

Some conservative commentators have moronically claimed that culture has “romanticized” suicide, or made it appear sexy or glamorous, and these writers conclude that this supposed romanticization is one thing contributing to the increase in suicide rates.

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