• Why You Should Learn Mental Health First Aid by Amy Chillag

Why You Should Learn Mental Health First Aid by Amy Chillag

Why You Should Learn Mental Health First Aid by Amy Chillag

Snippets:

One in five adults in the US lives with a mental health problem according to the National Institute of Mental Health – but most don’t seek out professional help. That’s where Mental Health First Aid – an eight-hour workshop – hopes to fill the gap.

The class trains citizens how to recognize the signs and symptoms of various mental illnesses — from depression to anxiety disorder and substance abuse disorder.

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• People Taking Antidepressants After The Age of 60 Are ‘THREE TIMES More Likely To Get Dementia Because They May Cause Nerve Damage’

People Taking Antidepressants After The Age of 60 Are ‘THREE TIMES More Likely To Get Dementia Because They May Cause Nerve Damage’

My disclaimer: I am NOT opposed to doctor-prescribed medications to treat mental health issues, in spite of the fact I do occasionally post content that is critical of such medications or of psychology or psychiatry. I am not opposed to the mental health profession, nor against medications, but, I am also not supportive of a view that any and all mental health treatments work for everyone.


People taking antidepressants after the age of 60 are ‘THREE TIMES more likely to get dementia because they may cause nerve damage’

June 2019

People taking antidepressants in middle or old age could have triple the risk of developing dementia, a study has found.

Antidepressants may damage or kill crucial nerve cells in the brain, researchers claimed in a study of more than 71,000 people.

Rates of dementia were found to be 3.4 times higher among people who took thedepression drugs after the age of 60.

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• Soteriology – Are Some Types of People “UnSavable?”

Soteriology – Are Some Types of People “UnSavable?”

I was just asking this on another blog. I will copy and paste most of my comment from there to here.

I’ve been wondering about this for months now.

There are some Christians, who, unfortunately, make holding “correct doctrine” a necessary component of receiving salvation, though I do not recall the Bible anywhere teaching this.

At most, the Bible says belief of Jesus as the Christ and acceptance of Jesus as Savior is the barometer of saving faith, and not whether or not one agrees with or believes in things such as Gender Complementarianism, Transubstantiation, the Pre-Trib Rapture, a literal Hell, an allegorical Hell, Old Age of the Earth, Young Earth Creationism, and so on.

There is the OSAS (once saved always saved) Vs. Conditional Security debate: some Christians believe once a person accepts Christ as Savior, she can never have her salvation taken away or revoked, while other Christians believe it is possible for someone who accepted Christ to have her salvation nullifed or cancelled because of personal sin.

I’ve done a lot of reading about Sociopaths and Psychopaths, and I’ve watched documentaries about them. Continue reading

• Psychiatry’s Incurable Hubris by G. Greenberg

Psychiatry’s Incurable Hubris by G. Greenberg

Psychiatry’s Incurable Hubris

Snippets:

The biology of mental illness is still a mystery, but practitioners don’t want to admit it.

…But, as Earle knew, psychiatrists could not peer into a microscope to see the biological source of their patients’ suffering, which arose, they assumed, from the brain.

They were stuck in the premodern past, dependent on “the apparent mental condition [his emphasis], as judged from the outward manifestations,” to devise diagnoses and treatments.

The protracted attempt to usher psychiatry into medicine’s modern era is the subject of Anne Harrington’s Mind Fixers: Psychiatry’s Troubled Search for the Biology of Mental Illness.

As her subtitle indicates, this is not a story of steady progress. Rather, it’s a tale of promising roads that turned out to be dead ends, of treatments that seemed miraculous in their day but barbaric in retrospect, of public-health policies that were born in hope but destined for disaster.

From ice baths to Prozac, each development Harrington describes was touted by its originators and adherents as the next great thing—and not without reason.

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• Families Defrauded by Unregulated Service Dog Trainers by Allen Breed

Families Defrauded by Unregulated Service Dog Trainers by Allen Breed

Families Defrauded by Unregulated Service Dog Trainers Allen Breed

….North Carolina has no such certification program [for service animals] — and neither does any other state.

The service dog industry — particularly in the field of “psychiatric” service dogs for people with autism and post-traumatic stress disorder — has exploded in recent years. But a near complete absence of regulation and oversight has left needy, desperate families vulnerable to incompetence and fraud.

“It is a lawless area. The Wild West,” says David Favre, a law professor at Michigan State University and editor of its Animal Legal and Historical Center website.

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• Worry, Stress, and Anger Rising Among Americans (2018-2019)

Americans are some of the most stressed people in the world, new Gallup poll finds

More than half of all Americans are very stressed out: poll

Gallup released its annual Global Emotions Reportthis week. The survey of 151,000 adults in more than 140 countries found that levels of stress, anger and worry spiked in the US during 2018.

Researchers ranked America as the seventh most-stressed country in the world — falling not far behind developing nations such as Tanzania and the Philippines, economically embattled Greece and war-torn Iran.

…About 55% of adults in the US said they’d felt stressed during “a lot of the day,” outranking the global average by 20%. Also, 45% said they’d felt worry, and another 22% had been angered recently.

Americans’ Stress, Worry and Anger Intensified in 2018 by Julie Ray

STORY HIGHLIGHTS
Americans among the most stressed in the world
Nearly half (45%) felt worried a lot
More than one in five (22%) felt angry a lot


WASHINGTON, D.C. — Even as their economy roared, more Americans were stressed, angry and worried last year than they have been at most points during the past decade.

Asked about their feelings the previous day, the majority of Americans (55%) in 2018 said they had experienced stress during a lot of the day, nearly half (45%) said they felt worried a lot and more than one in five (22%) said they felt anger a lot.

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• For Kids With Anxiety, Parents Learn To Let Them Face Their Fears by Angus Chen

For Kids With Anxiety, Parents Learn To Let Them Face Their Fears by Angus Chen

Snippets:

…”The parent’s own responses are a core and integral part of childhood anxiety,” says Eli Lebowitz, a psychologist at the Yale School of Medicine who developed the training.

…But this comforting [e.g., allowing your child to sleep with you in your bed at night because he is afraid to sleep alone]  — something psychologists call accommodation — can actually be counterproductive for children with anxiety disorders, Lebowitz says.

“These accommodations lead to worse anxiety in their child, rather than less anxiety,” he says. That’s because the child is always relying on the parents, he explains, so kids never learn to deal with stressful situations on their own and never learn they have the ability to cope with these moments.

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