• Nearly 1 in 7 US Kids And Teens Has A Mental Health Condition, And Half Go Untreated, Study Says (2019)

Nearly 1 in 7 US Kids And Teens Has A Mental Health Condition, And Half Go Untreated, Study Says (2019)

Nearly 1 in 7 US Kids And Teens Has A Mental Health Condition, And Half Go Untreated, Study Says (2019)

February 2019

By Dr. Edith Bracho-Sanchez

The researchers analyzed data from the 2016 National Survey of Children’s Health, a nationwide survey administered to parents of children and teens.

Of the 46.6 million children ages 6 through 18 whose parents completed the survey, 7.7 million had at least one mental health condition — such as depression, anxiety or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder — and only half received treatment or counseling from a mental health provider in the 12 months prior to the survey.

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• Grief Support Gone Wrong: When You’re Beyond Second Chances – from WYG site

Grief Support Gone Wrong: When You’re Beyond Second Chances – from WYG site

The one thing more difficult than losing my mother was the lack of emotional support I received after she died – that plus the insensitive comments and platitudes I got from other people.

I’ve been thinking of writing about my experiences with how horribly extended family, immediate family, online friends, real life friends, and church people hurt me or totally let me down in my time of grief, for this blog.

In the meantime, there is this page, linked to below, from WYG (“What’s Your Grief”) which outlines many of the ways you will be mistreated during your time of grief: you’ll either be ignored, wounded, insulted, or offended by the people in your life who should be emotionally supporting you (and perhaps offering practical help to you) during your time of grief.

I completely related to several items on this page.

I’m only going to place a portion of the WYG article on this page; if you’d like to read the entire thing, please use this link:

Grief Support Gone Wrong: When You’re Beyond Second Chances

Nothing puts a person’s support system to the test quite like a crisis. When the clouds of hardship dull the glare of more happy and carefree times, a person often sees their support system accurately for the very first time.

For some people, this is a reassuring experience, as they find their support system is similar to what they had assumed it would be. For others, it’s a bit, shall we say, disconcerting.

Many grieving people find that changes and disappointments within their support system become a secondary loss. They had assumed a certain type of support would be given and they feel hurt and angry when it isn’t.

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• Nine Ways Therapists Personally Deal With Grief by A. Drucker

Nine Ways Therapists Personally Deal With Grief

Nine Ways Therapists Personally Deal With Grief

Snippets (I’m not going to reproduce all nine steps from their page on my blog):

From a death to a job loss to an ended relationship, here’s how experts handle loss.

By Ali Drucker

While there’s no right way to grieve, there are a number of strategies that can help you get through loss.

When you think of grief, the first thing that comes to mind is likely mourning the death of a loved one. But grief can surface around any major life transition, like ending a relationship, dealing with an illness, or even losing a job.

As Melissa Fisher Goldman, a licensed clinical social worker and member of the Association of Death Education and Counseling puts it, “we don’t get over grief; we get through it.”

For a little help getting through it, HuffPost chatted with Goldman and other therapists for practical advice on how they personally deal with grief. Here’s how they handle it:

Allow Yourself To Cry

This method may be obvious, but it’s important to point out. Danielle Forshee, a licensed clinical social worker in New Jersey, said that during times of grief, she makes an effort not to suppress her tears.

There’s actually some science that supports the benefits of a good, cathartic sob.

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• The Long History of Sniffing Lavender to Reduce Anxiety By Edith Zimmerman

The Long History of Sniffing Lavender to Reduce Anxiety By Edith Zimmerman 

The Long History of Sniffing Lavender to Reduce Anxiety

Snippets:

In a paper published in Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, researchers found that smelling lavender measurably reduced anxiety in mice (not people, yet), comparable to the effects of taking diazepam.

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• Suicide Survivor Urges People to Ask For Help At Loneliest Time of the Year by L. Middelton

Suicide Survivor Urges People to Ask For Help At Loneliest Time of the Year

Suicide Survivor Urges People to Ask For Help At Loneliest Time of the Year

It’s billed as ‘the most wonderful time of the year’ – but for many the holiday season can be isolating, lonely and a struggle to get through.

Jody Betty attempted suicide on New Year’s Eve in 2011 after finding herself in a ‘hard spot’ over the festive period.

The 47-year-old, who now works in trauma recovery coaching and mental health peer support, has battled borderline personality disorder, major depressive order, anxiety and compound PTSD for most of her life.

‘I was done. I guess that day I just couldn’t see any hope,’ Jody told Metro.co.uk about her suicide attempt. ‘I find that depression sucks your ability to feel joy.  I just felt so dark that there was no return.’

Jody’s mother died when she was 19 and she doesn’t have a close relationship with her father, leaving her with no family members to spend the holidays with.

…‘Sometimes I think people just put that much pressure on that they can’t imagine another day. ‘It becomes scarier to face another day then it is to die.’ Jody, from Mississauga, Canada, first tried to kill herself when she was just eight years old.

Her early life had been spent moving from foster home to foster home, four of which was sexually abused in, all before the age of two.

She starting seeing a therapist when her mother died but found the treatment didn’t work for her, eventually giving it up.

But in 2015, five years after her New Year’s Eve suicide attempt, she broke down and restarted therapy, of which she continues still to do this day.

Her work in suicide prevention has since led her to pen an open letter to anyone contemplating ending their life entitled ‘I want you to want to live’.

‘If I could say something to myself before my suicide attempt, I would just say keep going,’ Jody said. ‘To anyone out there struggling – I’m not going to tell you everything is going to be ok. Instead I say hang on because you don’t know.

To read the rest of that article click here


More:

‘We Are Never Alone’: Embracing The Pain That Grips Many of Us During the Christmas Season by M. Dowd

Why We Get Depressed At The Holidays, And How To Deal by C. Gregoire

• The Rise of Anxiety Baking by A. Mull

The Rise of Anxiety Baking by A. Mull

The Rise of Anxiety Baking

This year has been rough. Make some cookies.

….Young Americans’ long work hours might mean they’re less likely to come home every night in time to roast a chicken instead of ordering takeout, but many of them seem to have turned to weekend baking as a salve for the ambient anxiety of being alive in 2018. There’s a good reason for that: Baking actually can be really relaxing.

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• Four Ways To Beat Anxiety by A. Downey

Four Ways To Beat Anxiety by A. Downey

Four Ways To Beat Anxiety by A. Downey

Snippets:

ANYONE who suffers from anxiety will tell you it is crippling and can take over your life.

…Anxiety disorders can develop as a result of a number of factors, including stress, genetics and childhood environment.

Luckily, there are some things you can do to manage the condition and even beat it for good, Olivia Remes, a PhD candidate at the University of Cambridge, writes for The Conversation.

“It can appear out of the blue as a panic attack, when sudden spikes of anxiety make you feel like you’re about to have a heart attack, go mad or lose control,” she said.

 “Or it can be present all the time, as in generalised anxiety disorder, when diffuse and pervasive worry consumes you and you look to the future with dread.

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