• Nearly 1 in 7 US Kids And Teens Has A Mental Health Condition, And Half Go Untreated, Study Says (2019)

Nearly 1 in 7 US Kids And Teens Has A Mental Health Condition, And Half Go Untreated, Study Says (2019)

Nearly 1 in 7 US Kids And Teens Has A Mental Health Condition, And Half Go Untreated, Study Says (2019)

February 2019

By Dr. Edith Bracho-Sanchez

The researchers analyzed data from the 2016 National Survey of Children’s Health, a nationwide survey administered to parents of children and teens.

Of the 46.6 million children ages 6 through 18 whose parents completed the survey, 7.7 million had at least one mental health condition — such as depression, anxiety or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder — and only half received treatment or counseling from a mental health provider in the 12 months prior to the survey.

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• After Struggle with Mental Illness, Megachurch Pastor Fatally Shoots Himself

After Struggle with Mental Illness, Megachurch Pastor Fatally Shoots Himself

As this news story shows, even a church preacher can struggle with depression and suicidal ideation.

Christians, most of you continue to teach a false “mental health gospel” that either goes like this:

“Accepting Jesus as your Lord and Savior will make you immune from  mental health problems,”
Or, your false mental health Gospel goes like this:
“Okay, you’re already a Christian, you’ve already accepted Jesus as your Savior, so if you are experiencing depression, or some other sort of mental health issue, it’s you’re fault, and you can fix it by (-insert spiritual activity here, e.g, more Bible reading, church attendance, prayer, etc-).”

(I’ve even seen some Southern Baptists reason in that manner, when they always scoff at other Christians who believe in a Physical Health and Wealth Gospel.)

The truth is, Jesus is not the answer for everything, the Bible is not a solution for everything, and the Christian faith does not make everything right in a person’s life.

Being a Christian – one who led a church no less – certainly did not heal this man of his problem with depression.

Jesus may be great for keeping someone out of Hell when they die, but the older I get, I’m having a difficult time seeing what use Jesus is for earthly problems.

After struggle with mental illness, megachurch pastor Jim Howard fatally shoots himself

by L. Blair

Jim Howard, lead pastor of the Valencia campus of the more than 6,000 member Real Life Church in California fatally shot himself in the head at home Wednesday after a protracted battle with mental illness.

“It is with a heavy heart that I can confirm we suffered a tragic loss on our church staff this week. On Wednesday, January 23, 2019, Jim Howard — a beloved pastor here at RLC — took his own life,” Rusty George, lead pastor of Real Life Church began in a statement released on Facebook last Thursday.

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• Grief Support Gone Wrong: When You’re Beyond Second Chances – from WYG site

Grief Support Gone Wrong: When You’re Beyond Second Chances – from WYG site

The one thing more difficult than losing my mother was the lack of emotional support I received after she died – that plus the insensitive comments and platitudes I got from other people.

I’ve been thinking of writing about my experiences with how horribly extended family, immediate family, online friends, real life friends, and church people hurt me or totally let me down in my time of grief, for this blog.

In the meantime, there is this page, linked to below, from WYG (“What’s Your Grief”) which outlines many of the ways you will be mistreated during your time of grief: you’ll either be ignored, wounded, insulted, or offended by the people in your life who should be emotionally supporting you (and perhaps offering practical help to you) during your time of grief.

I completely related to several items on this page.

I’m only going to place a portion of the WYG article on this page; if you’d like to read the entire thing, please use this link:

Grief Support Gone Wrong: When You’re Beyond Second Chances

Nothing puts a person’s support system to the test quite like a crisis. When the clouds of hardship dull the glare of more happy and carefree times, a person often sees their support system accurately for the very first time.

For some people, this is a reassuring experience, as they find their support system is similar to what they had assumed it would be. For others, it’s a bit, shall we say, disconcerting.

Many grieving people find that changes and disappointments within their support system become a secondary loss. They had assumed a certain type of support would be given and they feel hurt and angry when it isn’t.

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• Nine Ways Therapists Personally Deal With Grief by A. Drucker

Nine Ways Therapists Personally Deal With Grief

Nine Ways Therapists Personally Deal With Grief

Snippets (I’m not going to reproduce all nine steps from their page on my blog):

From a death to a job loss to an ended relationship, here’s how experts handle loss.

By Ali Drucker

While there’s no right way to grieve, there are a number of strategies that can help you get through loss.

When you think of grief, the first thing that comes to mind is likely mourning the death of a loved one. But grief can surface around any major life transition, like ending a relationship, dealing with an illness, or even losing a job.

As Melissa Fisher Goldman, a licensed clinical social worker and member of the Association of Death Education and Counseling puts it, “we don’t get over grief; we get through it.”

For a little help getting through it, HuffPost chatted with Goldman and other therapists for practical advice on how they personally deal with grief. Here’s how they handle it:

Allow Yourself To Cry

This method may be obvious, but it’s important to point out. Danielle Forshee, a licensed clinical social worker in New Jersey, said that during times of grief, she makes an effort not to suppress her tears.

There’s actually some science that supports the benefits of a good, cathartic sob.

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• Rob Delaney Wants To “Destigmatize Grief” By Opening Up About His First Christmas Since His Son Died by M. Blackmon – And: 2018 Examples of Grief

Rob Delaney Wants To “Destigmatize Grief” By Opening Up About His First Christmas Since His Son Died by M. Blackmon – And: 2018 Examples of Grief

The thing about grief is that it takes a lot of people two or more years to get through the passing of their loved one. Most Christians, though, act as though a person who experiences the death of a loved one should get over it instantly and do so in private (i.e., on their own, all alone).

There’s a complete ignorance, insensitivity, and impatience in how Christians handle someone they meet who is grieving.

I suppose that sometimes Non-Christians can be equally as terrible at dealing with grief, but it seems more common with Christians.

I think with the passing of time, that loss does get much easier to cope with, but one never stops missing their departed loved one, and the first few years after the death, particularly milestone dates, such as that person’s birthday, perhaps holidays, and so on, can be ten times more difficult to get through.

Notice how the people in the examples below are still emotional and upset about the passing of their loved one a year or more afterwards, and, it’s especially more difficult to cope with the death during holidays.

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• Small, Helpful Ways You Can Support a Loved One Who Is Dealing With Depression by K. Borresen

Small, Helpful Ways You Can Support a Loved One Who Is Dealing With Depression by K. Borresen

A lot of the following tips also work for anyone you know who is under-going grief due to the death of a loved one:

Small, Helpful Ways You Can Support a Loved One Who Is Dealing With Depression

Snippets:

Depression can manifest itself in a number of ways: prolonged and pervasive sadness; feelings of worthlessness or self-loathing; changes in appetite; sleep issues; irritability or lack of energy. All of these issues can take a toll on a person and make everyday life hard to manage.

“I often compare depression to the monster-under-the-bed mentality. You never know when it will creep out of its lair, ready to attack and make your life even more difficult and trying,” Karla Culbertson, who has depression, told HuffPost.
“Even though it can be extremely difficult to deal with, I find that it’s comforting to have family members and other loved ones who can support you through the darkest nooks of your life.”

One in six people will experience this mental health condition at some point in their life, which means that you or someone close to you is likely to be affected by depression.

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• ‘We Are Never Alone’: Embracing The Pain That Grips Many of Us During the Christmas Season by M. Dowd

‘We Are Never Alone’: Embracing The Pain That Grips Many of Us During the Christmas Season by M. Dowd

‘We Are Never Alone’: Embracing The Pain That Grips Many of Us During the Christmas Season by M. Dowd