• People Taking Antidepressants After The Age of 60 Are ‘THREE TIMES More Likely To Get Dementia Because They May Cause Nerve Damage’

People Taking Antidepressants After The Age of 60 Are ‘THREE TIMES More Likely To Get Dementia Because They May Cause Nerve Damage’

My disclaimer: I am NOT opposed to doctor-prescribed medications to treat mental health issues, in spite of the fact I do occasionally post content that is critical of such medications or of psychology or psychiatry. I am not opposed to the mental health profession, nor against medications, but, I am also not supportive of a view that any and all mental health treatments work for everyone.


People taking antidepressants after the age of 60 are ‘THREE TIMES more likely to get dementia because they may cause nerve damage’

June 2019

People taking antidepressants in middle or old age could have triple the risk of developing dementia, a study has found.

Antidepressants may damage or kill crucial nerve cells in the brain, researchers claimed in a study of more than 71,000 people.

Rates of dementia were found to be 3.4 times higher among people who took thedepression drugs after the age of 60.

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• Psychiatry’s Incurable Hubris by G. Greenberg

Psychiatry’s Incurable Hubris by G. Greenberg

Psychiatry’s Incurable Hubris

Snippets:

The biology of mental illness is still a mystery, but practitioners don’t want to admit it.

…But, as Earle knew, psychiatrists could not peer into a microscope to see the biological source of their patients’ suffering, which arose, they assumed, from the brain.

They were stuck in the premodern past, dependent on “the apparent mental condition [his emphasis], as judged from the outward manifestations,” to devise diagnoses and treatments.

The protracted attempt to usher psychiatry into medicine’s modern era is the subject of Anne Harrington’s Mind Fixers: Psychiatry’s Troubled Search for the Biology of Mental Illness.

As her subtitle indicates, this is not a story of steady progress. Rather, it’s a tale of promising roads that turned out to be dead ends, of treatments that seemed miraculous in their day but barbaric in retrospect, of public-health policies that were born in hope but destined for disaster.

From ice baths to Prozac, each development Harrington describes was touted by its originators and adherents as the next great thing—and not without reason.

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• Worry, Stress, and Anger Rising Among Americans (2018-2019)

Americans are some of the most stressed people in the world, new Gallup poll finds

More than half of all Americans are very stressed out: poll

Gallup released its annual Global Emotions Reportthis week. The survey of 151,000 adults in more than 140 countries found that levels of stress, anger and worry spiked in the US during 2018.

Researchers ranked America as the seventh most-stressed country in the world — falling not far behind developing nations such as Tanzania and the Philippines, economically embattled Greece and war-torn Iran.

…About 55% of adults in the US said they’d felt stressed during “a lot of the day,” outranking the global average by 20%. Also, 45% said they’d felt worry, and another 22% had been angered recently.

Americans’ Stress, Worry and Anger Intensified in 2018 by Julie Ray

STORY HIGHLIGHTS
Americans among the most stressed in the world
Nearly half (45%) felt worried a lot
More than one in five (22%) felt angry a lot


WASHINGTON, D.C. — Even as their economy roared, more Americans were stressed, angry and worried last year than they have been at most points during the past decade.

Asked about their feelings the previous day, the majority of Americans (55%) in 2018 said they had experienced stress during a lot of the day, nearly half (45%) said they felt worried a lot and more than one in five (22%) said they felt anger a lot.

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• Christians Combat Depression and Suicide Too; Pastors and Ministers share How They Get Through by J. Law

Christians combat depression and suicide too; pastors and ministers share how they get through by J. Law

Snippets:

The depression rate worldwide is on a continual rise and Christians are not immune.

With multiple headlines of pastors who died by suicide throughout the United States, The Christian Post decided to reach out to ministers to talk about how they combat their darkest moments.  

…Despite the increasing notice of depression and suicide nationally, the resources to help people in the church struggling with these thoughts or feelings are scarce.

According to the World Health Organization, depression at its worst leads to suicide and it affects 300 million people worldwide.

It’s estimated that 15 percent of people will experience depression at some point in their adult lives.

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• Shortage Of Psychiatrists Causing A Growing Mental Health Crisis

Shortage Of Psychiatrists Causing A Growing Mental Health Crisis

Some of the following dates from 2018, some from 2019.

Infographic: Psychiatry Shortage in the United States 

Severe Shortage Of Psychiatrists Exacerbated By Lack Of Federal Funding

There’s a shortage of psychiatrists for those most in need

….The shortage of psychiatrists who accept insurance in the United States is a serious problem. Suicide rates are climbing in the U.S. and nearly one in fiveAmericans lives with mental illness.

Yet among the 43.4 million people with a mental illness in the U.S., only about 43 percent received treatment in the past year. Psychiatrists not accepting insurance is a major barrier to receiving treatment.

Addressing the escalating psychiatrist shortage

More people are seeking mental health treatment, but there aren’t enough psychiatrists to meet the demand. Learn what academic medicine is doing to help deliver care now and train more psychiatrists for the future.

Psychiatrist Shortage Escalates As U.S. Mental Health Needs Grow

…Against a backdrop of mental health crises from mass shootings to an increase in suicides, there’s an unprecedented demand for psychiatrists,new data and physician recruiters report.

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• Suicide Runs In Family (2019 Study) by N. Rahhal

Suicide Runs In Family (2019 Study) by N. Rahhal

Suicide Runs In Family (2019 Study)

Suicide may run in families that tend to suffer from mental illnesses, a new study finds.

The tenth leading cause of death in the US, 47,173 Americans died by suicide in 2017.

The new study, conducted by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), suggests that families in which social anxiety is more common may also be at greater risk for suicide attempts.

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• Anaesthetic Could Be Used to Wipe Bad Memories And Phobias From People’s Minds by J. Gabbatis

Anaesthetic Could Be Used to Wipe Bad Memories And Phobias From People’s Minds

A Common Anesthetic Could Ease PTSD and Other Stress Disorders

Propofol reduces the intensity of traumatic memories

Propofol-induced deep sedation reduces emotional episodic memory reconsolidation in humans

 Scientists use propofol to disrupt people’s traumatic memories

Anaesthetic Could Be Used to Wipe Bad Memories And Phobias From People’s Minds

Asking patients to recall unpleasant memories shortly before being knocked out made it harder to recall those memories the next day

by J. Gabbatis, March 2019

Giving patients a dose of anaesthetic could help them to recover from past trauma or even cure phobias, a new study has suggested.

If people are asked to recall painful memories shortly before being knocked out by the drug propofol, scientists found those memories were noticeably weaker the next day.

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