• Religious Trauma Syndrome and the (Negative) Effects of Religion on Mental Health

Religious Trauma Syndrome and the (Negative) Effects of Religion on Mental Health

Several years ago, atheist Richard Dawkins made some kind of comment about any and all religion being taught to a child by his or her parents as being a form of “child abuse.” That Dawkins did not offer any caveats or qualifiers to that comment made it seem very obnoxious to me.

I personally do not think that all religion, or belief in a deity is always, or necessarily, or by default, detrimental. It would depend on the particulars involved.

There are many conservative (and possibly some progressive) Christians who would have an automatic negative response to a post such as this one, if they believe it includes Christianity.

Yet, these same Christians (the conservatives especially) would not hesitate to recognize and acknowledge the negative, harmful ramifications of Satanism, militant Islam, or some types of atheist worldviews. They seem hesitant to admit that those who wear the same label as themselves – “Christian” – also at times express repulsive views or practice abuse.

RTS – Religious Trauma Syndrome

I believe this is Winell’s site – or Dr. Darrel Ray’s:

Recovering From Religion

Podcast: Living After Faith

Dr. Marlene Winell joins us for a discussion of Religious Trauma Syndrome and PTSD. Valerie Tarico’s interview with Dr. Winnell. Journey Free Dr. Marlene Winnell’s

The Health Effects of Leaving Religion

…Not every recent deconvert necessarily needs these resources, though. Some who leave religion become healthier than they were before. This was the case for Annie Erlandson.

…Other negative health behaviors sometimes associated with being religious, according to social psychologist Dr. Clay Routledge in Psychology Today, are cognitive dissonance (consistent religious doubts can harm your health) and avoidant coping.

An example of the latter is the attitude that things are “all in God’s hands,” which could potentially keep people from taking action on behalf of their own health.

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• Baking Can Ease Depression

Baking Can Ease Depression

British movement uses baking to fight depression, mental health issues

Feeling Depressed? Maybe You Need to Knead

Psychologists Explain The Benefits Of Baking For Other People

Can baking make you happier?

5 Reasons Baking is Good for Mental Health

Therapists Now Encourage Cooking and Baking as Cures for Depression

Snippets:

A new report in the Wall Street Journal explores the development that therapists and mental health professionals in clinics across America have been instituting cooking and baking classes as a means to help people who suffer with depression.

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• 26 ‘Habits’ Of People With Depression by Sarah Schuster

26 ‘Habits’ Of People With Depression by Sarah Schuster

26 ‘Habits’ Of People With Depression

And because depression affects everyone differently, these little habits are different for everyone, too.

Apr 14, 2017
Written by Sarah Schuster

While depression can be in some ways the absence of action, there are still little habits, little routines, a person may pick up on when they re-enter a depressive episode.

These habits can be small indicators you’re beginning to feel depressed again.

They can even be positive things — habits developed to help you survive. And because depression affects everyone differently, these little habits are different for everyone, too.

To find out what habits people developed when they were experiencing depression, The Mighty asked their mental health community to share one thing they do when they’re depressed.

Here’s what they told us:

1. “I turn into a hermit. I just want to stay in my home and not go anywhere or see anyone. It’s my safe haven, and I just don’t want to leave it.” — Deanne R.

2. “Avoid everything. I ignore my phone, skip appointments or plans, don’t leave my house, stop paying bills, try to avoid talking to anyone. I’ve totally screwed up my life this way ― failed classes in college because I couldn’t leave my room.” — Sarah S.

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• Practical Advice on How to Help A Depressed (Possibly Suicidal) Friend by C. Madden, PhD

Practical Advice on How to Help A Depressed (Possibly Suicidal) Friend by C. Madden, PhD

Practical Advice on How to Help A Depressed (Possibly Suicidal) Friend by C. Madden, PhD

Snippets:

Robin Williams. Kate Spade. Now Anthony Bourdain.

Just three of many celebrities who have committed suicide recently.

While our hearts ache for those we loved from afar, the problem isn’t limited to the rich and famous. Statistically, death by suicide has risen by 25% since the year 1999, and suicide is in the top ten causes of death in the United States. It’s an epidemic.

As a therapist, I’m deeply concerned about this quickly escalating mental health crisis. If you yourself aren’t personally struggling with depression, I’m quite sure you know someone who is. That’s why I’m offering this practical advice on what to do when someone you love becomes depressed.

Don’t Pretend to Understand if You Don’t

Yes, you’ve been sad, but sadness is not depression. Depression isn’t being sad. If you haven’t struggled with real depression, you don’t understand.

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• Inappropriate Responses or Attitudes Towards Suicide Victims

Inappropriate Responses or Attitudes Towards Suicide Victims

TLDR = A summary of sorts of what follows below:

It’s the oddest thing: people who write editorials about people who have suicidal thoughts or about people who died from suicide claim to find suicide sad or upsetting, and they claim to have compassion for those with suicidal ideation, but they go on in their articles to insult and demean those very same people by calling them selfish, cowards, or what have you.


When a famous person kills him or herself, it’s common for commentators to rush out of the wood work to shame, scold, or criticize the person and offer up all manner of horrid advice on how said suicide could’ve been averted.

Some conservative commentators have moronically claimed that culture has “romanticized” suicide, or made it appear sexy or glamorous, and these writers conclude that this supposed romanticization is one thing contributing to the increase in suicide rates.

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• The Mystery Around Middle-Age Suicides By Sumathi Reddy

The Mystery Around Middle-Age Suicides By Sumathi Reddy

The Mystery Around Middle-Age Suicides By Sumathi Reddy

The death rate is climbing for those between 45 and 64, new CDC data show

June 14, 2018

The recent suicides of two well-known figures— celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain and fashion designer Kate Spade— underscore a sobering reality: Suicide rates for people in middle age are higher than almost any other age group in the U.S. and rising quickly.

…Experts say mental illness, substance abuse, loneliness and financial and relationship problems all have contributed to suicide rates increasing. But it’s unclear why suicide appears to peak in middle-aged people.

“Life satisfaction hits an all-time low in middle age. This dip in happiness is known as the U curve,” says Samantha Boardman, a clinical instructor in medicine and psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City.

“Depression and stress are particularly high in this age group. Juggling responsibilities and managing multiple roles takes a toll and can lead to feeling overwhelmed, a loss of control and despair.”

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• The Pain Wrought by Complementarian Theology by Elesha Coffman

The Pain Wrought by Complementarian Theology by Elesha Coffman

Yes, complementarian theology has real-life, usually negative, consequences upon the lives of girls and women, but do complementarians care? Nope.

Defending their particular interpretation of the Bible – which entails complementarianism – takes precedence over the welfare of actual people.

The Pain Wrought by Complementarian Theology

Snippets:

First off, let me say that I agree with everything Emily Hunter McGowin wrote about the gas-lighting of evangelical women long before, and far beyond, what has recently been exposed about Paige Patterson and the Southern Baptist Convention.

I heard all of the same messages she did as I grew up in evangelical churches, conditioning me to believe that it was my constant responsibility to manage men’s sexual temptation while deferring to their authority.

The specific contours of evangelical gender ideology, especially as defined by the Religious Right from the 1970s onward, place crushing burdens on women. I ultimately had to leave evangelicalism in order not to lose my faith and my sanity.

But it’s not just evangelicalism.

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