• How Far Can Abused Women Go To Protect Themselves? (Gender Bias in the Legal System) by E. Flock

How Far Can Abused Women Go To Protect Themselves? (Gender Bias in the Legal System) by E. Flock

I was horrified and upset to see illustrated in this report the huge double standard between how men and women are treated legally if and when they use self defense – women come out being treated unfairly, while men do not.

This happens to be a very long read, but I encourage the reader to click the link to the read the entire piece.

I will only be providing some excerpts from the page, not the entire page, on my blog.

How Far Can Abused Women Go To Protect Themselves? (Gender Bias in the Legal System)

[Long story involving a woman named Brittany who was doing a favor for her drug-addicted friend, Todd.

Todd phoned Brittany claiming to be stranded and without a place to stay, so she picked him up and allowed him to stay at her place.

Once he was at Brittany’s place, he brutally raped and beat her, and told her if she told the police or anyone else that he would murder her.

Things escalated more, when Brittany managed to warn her family about Todd keeping her hostage all day.

Brittany’s brother Chris confronted Todd, Brittany had to shoot and kill Todd to save her brother Chris from being killed by Todd.

Brittany called 911 to get Todd, who was dying on the floor, some medical help, and the police showed up to her home.

If I recall correctly, the police took photos of Brittany once they got there, and there was, I believe, a medical test performed on her at a hospital, where medical professionals logged the extent of injuries Brittany had suffered at Todd’s hands. I think there was a rape test performed as well.

The point being, either the police or hospital staff (or both) had PROOF that Brittany had been raped and beaten by Todd.

 When all was said and done, the legal system and the court appointed psychiatrists and psychologists  then proceeded to blame Brittany and to treat her like a lunatic and a liar.

During one appointment with a mental health professional, the doctor laughed in amusement when she told him how Todd mocked her voice when she was begging him to stop raping her.

The article goes on to say that in states that have a “stand your ground law,” the legal side always believes the men who say they were acting in self defense, and these men get off.

However, women who claim self defense are thrown in jail, they are not believed. Judges won’t allow their claims of domestic violence be brought up in court cases, even though the women killed their husbands or boyfriends because they were being beaten literally to death.]

…Initially, Chris and Brittany [who are siblings] told the police that he had killed Todd.

Both of them believed that a woman who had defended herself against violence would never get a fair trial in Jackson County, where Stevenson is situated.

“I hate to say this, but, Jackson County, they’re a little bit behind on the times,” Chris told me, arguing that, if law enforcement had known that it was Brittany who fired the gun, they would not have taken her for a rape-kit examination until it was too late.

Women, he said, “get the short end of the stick.”

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• Rape Law After Harvey Weinstein by S. Green

Rape Law After Harvey Weinstein by S. Green

I see some parallels and applicability to the topics of C.S.A. (Clergy Sex Abuse), complementarian teachings to women about sex and marriage, and how churches mistreat victims of sexual in the Christian church, as the issues discussed in the article below.

Rape Law After Harvey Weinstein

by S. Green

In the #MeToo era, should we see sexual contact between the powerful and the relatively powerless as inherently coercive?

January 4, 2019

…Mr. Weinstein’s alleged crimes and misconduct can be divided into three broad categories. The first consists of physically forcing a victim to endure a sexual assault against her will.

This is what the actress Annabella Sciorra, for example, alleges Mr. Weinstein did to her in 1993, when she says he attacked her in her Manhattan apartment. If proven, such conduct would clearly constitute rape.

A second category involves inducing a victim into sex by using coercive, non-violent threats – of the “have sex with me or you’ll never work in this town again” sort. Conduct like this typically wouldn’t have been prosecuted before the mid-1990s.

Today, it routinely is.

Legal authorities now share a broad consensus that sex without valid consent is rape, and that “consent” obtained by coercive threat isn’t valid.

What won’t be on trial in January, however, is a third and more problematic category of sexual misconduct, of the sort that not only Mr. Weinstein but countless other men have been accused of during the #MeToo movement.

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• Godly Men, Be Quiet By S. Krehbiel

Godly Men, Be Quiet By S. Krehbiel

Godly Men, Be Quiet By S. Krehbiel

Snippets:

….Patriarchal Christian masculinity is a powerful drug. It makes many church men believe that the world desperately needs their perspective on everything.

It makes their followers believe that asking such men to step aside from leadership is somehow tantamount to cruelty. 

God is always calling these men to lead someone or something, even when what they know about that thing may be approximately two cents less than nothing

Particularly in the evangelical world, the spiritual quality that seems to most define men like this is their ability to imagine that they hear God in the voice of their own ambition.

And then, inevitably, they start talking about healing, and positioning themselves as experts on how survivors should heal and need to heal. They cultivate suspiciously in-house quasi-professionals. They host high-profile healing services.

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• Calvinists More Likely To Believe Domestic Violence Myths and Oppose Social Justice, Study Finds (2018)

Calvinists More Likely To Believe Domestic Violence Myths and Oppose Social Justice, Study Finds (2018)

Calvinists More Likely To Believe Domestic Violence Myths and Oppose Social Justice, Study Finds (2018)

Snippets:

By Napp Nazworth, Christian Post Reporter

Christians who hold Calvinist beliefs are more likely to believe certain myths about domestic violence against women and oppose social justice advocacy, a new study has found.

The study surveyed 238 seminary students and found that those who agreed with Calvinist beliefs were also more likely to agree with certain statements like, “A lot of domestic violence occurs because women keep on arguing about things with their partners,” and “Many women have an unconscious wish to be dominated by their partners,” according to a Dec. 20 article at PsyPost.org.

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• At the Evangelical #MeToo Summit, Christians Grappled With Just How Deep the Church’s Sexual Misconduct Problems Go by R. Graham

At the Evangelical #MeToo Summit, Christians Grappled With Just How Deep the Church’s Sexual Misconduct Problems Go by R. Graham

At the Evangelical #MeToo Summit, Christians Grappled With Just How Deep the Church’s Sexual Misconduct Problems Go by R. Graham

Dec 14, 2018

Snippets:

Within weeks of the ignition of the #MeToo movement last fall, activists with ties to evangelicalism began pointing out that abuse in Christian contexts often has its own awful dimensions.

Church leaders—typically men—are generally assumed to have God-given authority, for example. Scripture and theology can be used as weapons to perpetuate silence and shame.

And institutions pressure whistleblowers and victims to muffle potential scandals in the name of protecting God’s work. The activists called their movement #ChurchToo.

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