• Sexual Assault Victims Who Turn on Sexual Assault Victims by K. Burmeister

Sexual Assault Victims Who Turn on Sexual Assault Victims by K. Burmeister

Sexual Assault Victims Who Turn on Sexual Assault Victims

Snippets:

October 2018

Most sexual assault survivors are supportive of other survivors, but sometimes a sexual assault victim comes along who isn’t supportive. Sometimes these victims are outright hostile toward survivors.

It can be hard to understand why these fellow victims would try to throw other victims under the bus. In my experience, there are a few reasons this might happen, and I believe it’s important for us to be aware of these reasons as we’re having these difficult conversations.

….They Might Actually be a Jerk

Anyone can be the victim of sexual assault. Women. Men. Straight. LGBTQ. Adults. Children. Elders.

And jerks. Jerks can be sexually assaulted too.

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• What Kind of Person Makes False Rape Accusations? by S. Newman

What Kind of Person Makes False Rape Accusations? by S. Newman

What Kind of Person Makes False Rape Accusations?

Snippets:

False rape accusations loom large in the cultural imagination. We don’t forget the big ones:
The widely-read 2014 Rolling Stone article, later retracted, about a brutal gang rape at the University of Virginia; the 2006 accusations against innocent members of the Duke University lacrosse team.

These cases are readily cited by defense attorneys and Republican lawmakers and anyone else who wants a reason to discuss the dangers of false allegations. What if a woman has consensual sex, and then regrets it the next day?

What if a woman gets dumped by her boyfriend and decides to accuse him of rape as revenge?

What if she’s just doing it for attention?

Are false accusations reaching epidemic levels in today’s hard-drinking hookup culture, where the lines of consent have been blurred? Critics argue that reports of rape should be treated with more caution, since men’s lives are so often ruined by women’s malicious lies.

But my research—including academic studies, journalistic accounts, and cases recorded in the US National Registry of Exonerations—suggests that every part of this narrative is wrong.

What’s more, it’s wrong in ways that help real rapists escape justice, while perversely making it more likely that we will miss the signs of false reports.

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• Inappropriate Responses or Attitudes Towards Suicide Victims

Inappropriate Responses or Attitudes Towards Suicide Victims

TLDR = A summary of sorts of what follows below:

It’s the oddest thing: people who write editorials about people who have suicidal thoughts or about people who died from suicide claim to find suicide sad or upsetting, and they claim to have compassion for those with suicidal ideation, but they go on in their articles to insult and demean those very same people by calling them selfish, cowards, or what have you.


When a famous person kills him or herself, it’s common for commentators to rush out of the wood work to shame, scold, or criticize the person and offer up all manner of horrid advice on how said suicide could’ve been averted.

Some conservative commentators have moronically claimed that culture has “romanticized” suicide, or made it appear sexy or glamorous, and these writers conclude that this supposed romanticization is one thing contributing to the increase in suicide rates.

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• Non-Christians Twice as Likely to Seek Mental Health Counseling as Practicing Christians: Barna Study

The Barna Study is here:

Americans Feel Good About Counseling

Millions of Americans face mental illness each year, according to NAMI. Yet the stigma surrounding mental health is acutely felt—even in the Church, which has at times struggled in its messaging on the issue.

This is despite the fact that, according to new Barna data, Americans by far have positive experiences with counseling—a practice that helps them heal from trauma, facilitate mental health, build strong relationships and change destructive patterns of thinking.

In a new study, Barna wanted to know just how many American adults are engaging in counseling and how they feel about the practice.

The article about the study:

Non-Christians Twice as Likely to Seek Mental Health Counseling as Practicing Christians: Barna Study

By Michael Gryboski , Christian Post Reporter | Feb 28, 2018 11:01 AM

Non-Christians are more than twice as likely to acknowledge seeking counseling for mental health issues than practicing Christians, according to a recent study by the Barna Group.

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• The Female Price of Male Pleasure (response to #MeToo criticisms) L. Loofbourow

The Female Price of Male Pleasure (response to #MeToo criticisms) by L. Loofbourow

I remain amazed at people who continue to ignore that social conditioning does play a big role in the differences between men and women.

Many people continue to want to assume that men are more sexual, or more aggressive, or more “whatever” than women are, that these differences are unchangeable and due to biology, and, ergo, women should not or cannot expect men to behave with respect towards women, or, it’s put forward “that’s just the way life it, it’s not going to change, so ladies, just ‘suck it up buttercup’ and put up with it.” I’ve even seen a small number of women argue as much.

The onus is once more put on women to be responsible for men’s behavior, (to avoid being raped, etc.)

Many of the things women are conditioned and brainwashed into enduring from men and culture are quite similar to what Christian gender complemenarians train girls and women to think and do as well, only complementarians like to argue that God designed women and society to be this way.

The Female Price of Male Pleasure (response to #MeToo criticisms)

The world is disturbingly comfortable with the fact that women sometimes leave a sexual encounter in tears.

When Babe.net published a pseudonymous woman’s account of a difficult encounter with Aziz Ansari that made her cry, the internet exploded with “takes” arguing that the #MeToo movement had finally gone too far.

“Grace,” the 23-year-old woman, was not an employee of Ansari’s, meaning there were no workplace dynamics.

Her repeated objections and pleas that they “slow down” were all well and good, but they did not square with the fact that she eventually gave Ansari oral sex. Finally, crucially, she was free to leave.

Why didn’t she just get out of there as soon as she felt uncomfortable? many people explicitly or implicitly asked.

It’s a rich question, and there are plenty of possible answers. But if you’re asking in good faith, if you really want to think through why someone might have acted as she did, the most important one is this: Women are enculturated to be uncomfortable most of the time. And to ignore their discomfort.

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• Asking for Clarification of Intent or of Content Got Me A Lea Smack Down at TWW Blog

Asking for Clarification of Intent or of Content Got Me A Lea Smack Down at TWW Blog

I didn’t want to detract from Jules’ story at TWW (The Wartburg Watch) blog, so I am posting this here on my blog.

I am referencing these blog posts at The Wartburg Watch blog (I don’t want to link to the posts themselves, as they will create ping backs, and I don’t want to create ping backs):

Post 1. Dated Jan 5, 2018, title:
I Thought He Was Taking Me for Ice Cream: One Woman’s #MeToo Story of Molestation By Her Former Youth Pastor, Andy Savage

Post 2. Dated Jan 8, 2018, title:
More Developments As Well As the Drop the Mic Moments in the Andy Savage/Highpoint Memphis #metoo Situation

In the second post mentioned above, I got into a little bit of a dispute at that site with a poster named Lea, who I don’t remember ever having a problem with previously.

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• Sexism Existed Before Liberal Secular 1960s Feminism, Before the Me Too Twitter Trend, and Before Trump Was Elected President

 Sexism Existed Before Liberal Secular 1960s Feminism, Before the Me Too Twitter Trend, and Before Trump Was Elected President

In the following post, I take about every one to task:
Republicans, liberals, Democrats, conservatives, Trump supporters, Trump haters. You name it, I critique about every one here, regardless of where they stand politically.

So hang on and don’t quit reading at the first  several paragraphs in fury if you are a Trump hater, a liberal, a feminist, or a Democrat, because I also get around to addressing conservative and Republican writers who blame liberal feminists for rape and sexism.

Trump

Ever since Trump won office, I have seen many women – on blogs, Facebook groups, or in editorials in newspapers – imply or suggest that sexism exists now in American culture because Trump is in office.

A few of these Trump detractors may argue that sexism is now ‘worse’ under Trump than it was pre-Trump, but the sense I get from many women who dislike Trump is that Trump invented sexism.

I’m not kidding. The writing I’ve seen from some of these women (occasionally also by men who dislike Trump) is that there was no such thing as sexism in the U.S.A. until Trump won office in 2016.

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