• People Taking Antidepressants After The Age of 60 Are ‘THREE TIMES More Likely To Get Dementia Because They May Cause Nerve Damage’

People Taking Antidepressants After The Age of 60 Are ‘THREE TIMES More Likely To Get Dementia Because They May Cause Nerve Damage’

My disclaimer: I am NOT opposed to doctor-prescribed medications to treat mental health issues, in spite of the fact I do occasionally post content that is critical of such medications or of psychology or psychiatry. I am not opposed to the mental health profession, nor against medications, but, I am also not supportive of a view that any and all mental health treatments work for everyone.


People taking antidepressants after the age of 60 are ‘THREE TIMES more likely to get dementia because they may cause nerve damage’

June 2019

People taking antidepressants in middle or old age could have triple the risk of developing dementia, a study has found.

Antidepressants may damage or kill crucial nerve cells in the brain, researchers claimed in a study of more than 71,000 people.

Rates of dementia were found to be 3.4 times higher among people who took thedepression drugs after the age of 60.

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• 2018 Study Links Some Antidepressants, Bipolar Medications, Parkinson’s Drugs To Dementia

2018 Study Links Some Antidepressants, Bipolar Medications, Parkinson’s Drugs To Dementia

SAN FRANCISCO (KPIX 5) — New research is raising important questions as to whether certain widely-prescribed drugs may be linked to dementia.

Globally, 50 million people are living with dementia, and it’s predicted to increase around the world to 132 million by 2050.

Doctors and public health experts realize that countries need to develop preventive health policies to reduce the neurodegenerative condition.

One strategy: to swap out certain medications or have doctors think twice before prescribing them. These medicines include certain antidepressants, bipolar medications, antispasmodics taken for bladder control, as well as some Parkinson’s drugs.

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• A New (2018) Study Links Antidepressants to Weight Gain

A New Study Links Antidepressants to Weight Gain

By JAMIE DUCHARME
May 23, 2018

A new study published in The BMJ has found that antidepressant use may be associated with weight gain over time.

“Patients who were normal weight were more likely to transition to overweight, and overweight patients were more likely to transition to obesity if they were treated with antidepressants,” said study co-author Rafael Gafoor, a primary care and public health researcher at King’s College London, in an email to TIME.

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• Lost Connections: Uncovering the Real Causes of Depression and the Unexpected Solutions by Johann Hari

Regarding the book ‘Lost Connections: Uncovering the Real Causes of Depression and the Unexpected Solutions’ by Johann  Hari

I saw Hari interviewed on television about his book (his website about the book).

He states in his estimation one reason for the high numbers of depression in the United States, and perhaps elsewhere, is that people are lonely. They do not have as many social connections now as they did in the past.

He questions how effective anti-depressant medications are. (I was prescribed anti-depressant medications myself for many years from the several psychiatrists that I saw for depression, and they did not help my depression. Neither did the medications I was prescribed for anxiety cure me of anxiety. However, I don’t discourage other people from trying medications.)

Here are links about his book about this subject:

Is everything you think you know about depression wrong? by Johann Hari

In this extract from his new book, Johann Hari, who took antidepressants for 13 years, calls for a new approach

Lost Connections by Johann Hari review – too many drugs, not enough understanding

Part personal odyssey and part investigation, this rigorous if flawed study finds fault with contemporary treatment of depression and anxiety

[Hari, the author, experienced depression when younger. When he sought out medical help, the doctor gave him anti-depressant medication]

… It wasn’t until he was in his 30s that he thought of all the questions the doctor didn’t ask, such as: what was his life like?

What was making him sad? What changes could be made to make life more tolerable?

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