• A Rescue Plan For The Anxious Child by Andrea Petersen

This article from The Wall Street Journal, which I include further below in this post, reminds me of my childhood.

I had social anxiety disorder and generalized anxiety disorder. I still struggle with some of these things, but I don’t think it’s as severe in some ways now for me.

When I was a kid, and even into my 20s, I was usually too afraid to make eye contact with waiters in restaurants, or talk to waiters to give them my order – I sometimes forced myself to do those things, however.

None of the mental health professionals I saw for over two decades diagnosed me with anxiety, though I had a severe case of anxiety since childhood. I had to do research on my own to figure out that is what it was called – anxiety.

When I got older and brought this up with a psychiatrist I was seeing, and described it to her, she agreed I had anxiety disorders, as did the next doctor I saw, and they both prescribed anti-anxiety medications for me (the medications did not work. Yes, we tried using the meds at different dosages. Yes, I tried different meds. None of that worked.)

One odd thing about this 2017 article I link you to below is that there is one quite similar to it from 2008 by the same author, also on the same news site.

I have some comments below this:

The Right Way for Parents to Help Anxious Children

Snippets:

Anxiety disorders are common in childhood, and many parents naturally want to shield their youngsters from distress. But that is often the exact opposite of what they should do

December 8, 2017

By Andrea Petersen

…Anxiety becomes a disorder… when it impairs a child’s basic functioning – preventing her from going to school or making friends, for example – or causes serious distress. Anxious kids tend to have physical symptoms, such as headaches and stomachaches, which don’t have a medical cause.

Anxiety disorders are remarkably common among children in the U.S.: nearly one-third of them will have an anxiety disorder by age 18, according to a 2010 study in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry – and girls are more at risk.
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